• search hit 1 of 1
Back to Result List

Better Resilient than Resistant—Regeneration Dynamics of Storm-Disturbed Mangrove Forests on the Bay Island of Guanaja (Honduras) during the First Two Decades after Hurricane Mitch (October 1998)

  • Located at the interface of land and sea, Caribbean mangroves frequently experience severe disturbances by hurricanes, but in most cases storm-impacted mangrove forests are able to regenerate. How exactly regeneration proceeds, however, is still a matter of debate: does—due to the specific site conditions—regeneration follows a true auto-succession with exactly the same set of species driving regeneration that was present prior to the disturbance, or do different trajectories of regeneration exist? Considering the fundamental ecosystem services mangroves provide, a better understanding of their recovery is crucial. The Honduran island of Guanaja offers ideal settings for the study of regeneration dynamics of storm-impacted mangrove forests. The island was hit in October 1998 by Hurricane Mitch, one of the most intense Atlantic storms of the past century. Immediately after the storm, 97% of the mangroves were classified as dead. In 2005, long-term monitoring on the regeneration dynamics of the mangroves of the island was initiated,Located at the interface of land and sea, Caribbean mangroves frequently experience severe disturbances by hurricanes, but in most cases storm-impacted mangrove forests are able to regenerate. How exactly regeneration proceeds, however, is still a matter of debate: does—due to the specific site conditions—regeneration follows a true auto-succession with exactly the same set of species driving regeneration that was present prior to the disturbance, or do different trajectories of regeneration exist? Considering the fundamental ecosystem services mangroves provide, a better understanding of their recovery is crucial. The Honduran island of Guanaja offers ideal settings for the study of regeneration dynamics of storm-impacted mangrove forests. The island was hit in October 1998 by Hurricane Mitch, one of the most intense Atlantic storms of the past century. Immediately after the storm, 97% of the mangroves were classified as dead. In 2005, long-term monitoring on the regeneration dynamics of the mangroves of the island was initiated, employing permanent line-transects at six different mangrove localities all around the island, which have been revisited in 2009 and 1016. Due to the pronounced topography of the island, different successional pathways emerge depending on the severity of the previous disturbance.show moreshow less

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar
Metadaten
Author:Thomas Fickert
DOI:https://doi.org/10.3390/d10010008
ISSN:1424-2818
Parent Title (English):Diversity
Publisher:MDPI AG
Place of publication:Basel
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of Completion:2018
Date of Publication (online):2018/01/27
Date of first Publication:2018/01/27
Publishing Institution:Universität Passau
Release Date:2018/02/12
Tag:Guanaja; Hurricane disturbance; Mangrove regeneration; Successional pathways
Volume:10
Issue:1
Note:
Gefördert durch den Publikationsfonds der Universitätsbibliothek Passau
Source:2018, 10, 1
Institutes:Philosophische Fakultät / Philosophische Fakultät / Geographie
Dewey Decimal Classification:9 Geschichte und Geografie / 91 Geografie, Reisen / 910 Geografie, Reisen
open_access (DINI-Set):open_access
Licence (German):License LogoCC by: Creative Commons - Namensnennung