Help

Answers

What can I publish?
The institutional OPUS Publication Server of HWR Berlin allows for the possibility to archive and publish digital scientific content. Via the OPUS Publication Server the following content can be made available in terms of Open Access: esp., publication series of HWR Berlin, scientific articles in the form of self-archiving, reports of research projects at HWR Berlin, academic content created by professors of HWR Berlin, and outstanding final thesis of students of HWR Berlin. Further final theses can be archived and published on the OPUS Publication Server within the network of HWR Berlin and may be accessed from the premises of HWR Berlin or via VPN.
How can I publish?
To make content available, authors or editors give said content to the library of HWR Berlin for publication. Authors and editors include the completed and signed Deposite licence (i. e., the publication contract for the OPUS Publication Server). Authors and editors are asked to provide their content as a PDF-file and support the library in its gathering of relevant metadata.
The German law on copyright, the Gesetz über Urheberrecht und verwandte Schutzrechte (Urheberrechtsgesetz), allows creators of literature, science and art protection for their works. The complete law can be consulted via http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/urhg/index.html.
What are Creative Commons Licences?
With the help of open content licences such as Creative Commons licences (CC licences) the authors and editors of a work can allow others to use, distribute, and to make and distribute derivations of copyrighted works. CC licences exist in different versions and build upon the more restrictive copyright (German: Urheberrecht). For content on the OPUS Publication Server the open access licence “CC-BY” is recommended. The respectively chosen licence is determined in the publication contract, the deposite licence.

Choose a fitting licence for your content via: https://creativecommons.org/choose/

Self-archiving (German: Zweitveröffentlichung) via the OPUS Publication Server
Publishing on the OPUS Publication Server need not be at odds with publishing the same work with a publisher. If you wish a further publication of your content, please check in advance whether the respective publisher allows for this. Information on the publishers’ policies regarding this topic can be found via: SHERPA/ROMEO


Further information: [in German] Rechtsfragen bei Open Science - Ein Leitfaden (2019) von Till Kreutzer und Henning Lahmann - Legal questions in Open Science - Guidelines (2019) by Till Kreutzer and Henning Lahmann

Core themes that are discussed and explained are, among others:

  • Urheber- und Urhebervertragsrecht (Copyright and copyright contract law)
  • Recht an Forschungsdaten (Research data)
  • Open Educational Resources (OER): Freier Zugang zu Lehr- und Lernmaterialien
  • Persönlichkeitsrechte und Datenschutz (Personal rights and data protection)
  • Quelloffene Technologien (Open Source)
  • Rechtliche Fragen zu Offenen Lizenzen, Veröffentlichungsvereinbarungen sowie Zweitveröffentlichungen (Legal questions concerning open content licences, publication contracts, as well as self-archiving)


Please note that the information provided here does not constitute legal consultation and is presented without a guarantee of completeness or validity (no liability assumed). Please accept that we cannot and may not provide individual legal consultation pertaining to publishing contracts.

Deposit-License for the publication of final theses
This content is being updated and will be available shortly. Thank you for your patience.
Deposit-License for the publication of academic publications

For the digital publication of academic publications a deposit-license, i. e., a publication contract, needs to be agreed upon between the respective author(s) and HWR Berlin. The deposit-license confirms which type of access the author(s) want to grant to the publication on the OPUS publication server. The academic library recommends choosing a Creative Commons license as part of the transformation of HWR Berlin towards Open Access (recommended is CC-BY 4.0).

The Deposit-License for the publication of academic publications can be downloaded via the OPUS publicationserver of HWR Berlin. This document is filled in digitally, printed, and signed by the respective author(s). [Please note that the legally binding text of this document is only avaiable in German.]

This document will be archived by the academic library of HWR Berlin.

Declaration of consent for the processing of third party personal data

The authors fill in the Declaration of consent for the processing of third party personal data when submitting their thesis / scientific work to the respective department.
This document is archived by the university library.

Recommendation for the Open Access publication of a final thesis
This content is being updated and will be available shortly. Thank you for your patience.
OPUS metadata sheet for open access publications
The metadata sheet for open access publications on the OPUS publication server of the Berlin School of Economics and Law is to be filled in by the authors and is reproduced by the university library, i.e. it is the last one after the publication has been published on the OPUS publication server Page of the publication and serves to understand the origin of this and to support the correct citation.
Open Access Website of HWR Berlin


Information on open access, publishing open access, as well as open access news at HWR Berlin and the (inter-)national context, via: https://www.hwr-berlin.de/en/hwr-berlin/service-facilities/hwr-berlin-libraries/open-access/

Open Access Glossary of HWR Berlin


Please note that the information provided in this glossary do not constitute legal consultation. This glossary and the contained information are presented without a guarantee of completeness or validity. HWR Berlin is not liable for potential misunderstandings, faulty information or changing contexts.


Article Processing Charges (APCs)
Article Processing Charges (APCs) can be charged to finance the Open Access publication of scientific content. APCs can occur in a range of prices and cover different types of services, e. g., with publishers (see e. g.: Open APC Initiative). Further information: Open Access Business Models


arXiv.org
arXiv.org (pronounced „archive“) is a pre-print server for several academic disciplines (esp. physics, mathematics, computer science, quantitative biology, quantitative finance, statistics, electrical engineering and systems science, and economics). arXiv.org is used for the prompt dissemination of research findings and esp. for pre-prints (i. e., manuscript versions of academic articles). arXiv.org employs several measures of quality assurance such as only allowing publication upon previous endorsement by another active arXiv user and the critical reception of the community involved in the respective discipline.


Berliner Erklärung (Berlin Declaration)
The „Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities“ (Berlin Declaration) has been created in 2003 and constitutes an important, international definition and declaration of intent for Open Access. The main claim is the free, irrevocable, worldwide, right of access to scientific information. The Berlin Declaration addresses scientific text-based publications as well as research data, visual materials and further research outcomes. umfasst klassische wissenschaftliche Text-Publikationen ebenso wie Forschungsdaten, Bildmaterial und andere Forschungsprodukte. The goal is the right to copy, use, distribute, and to make and distribute derivative works of scientific information – while acknowledging authorship in the spirit of good scientific practice. Hochschule für Wirtschaft und Recht Berlin signed the Berlin Declaration in 2018.


Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI)
The Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI) is the first international and interdisciplinary initiative to define Open Access as it is still understood today. The BOAI’s claims, presented in 2002, are to be seen as fundamental for the global development of Open Access infrastructures.


Book Processing Charges (BPCs)
Book Processing Charges (BPCs), similarly to Article Processing Charges (APCs) for academic articles, are publication charges that can arise for the Open Access publication of eBooks.


Citizen Science
Citizen Science is an open and participatory form of science that actively includes citizens in research and research project. Further information: Bürger schaffen Wissen


Copyright (German: Urheberrecht)
The German copyright law, „Gesetz über Urheberrecht und verwandte Schutzrechte (Urheberrechtsgesetz)“, protects the content of creators of literary, scientific and artistic works. Further information: German copyright law (German: Urheberrecht-Gesetzestext)


Creative Commons licenses (CC Licences)
Creative Commons licenses (CC licences) are open content licences: they allow for the use and reuse of content (such as text-based publications, (research) data, etc.) beyond copyright restrictions (German: Urheberrecht). The non-profit organisation Creative Commons defined these licences. CC licences are legally binding, machine- and human-readable, and they exist in different degrees of openness. Following the Berlin Declaration CC-BY has been established as a standard Open Access licence. This licence entails the right to use, reuse, analyse, create derivative works, and publish the respective content – while including the necessity of attributing the original and involved creators at all times.


Closed Access
Closed Access describes subscription-based access to information resources. This is in line with the traditional publishing business that only makes publications accessible when a one-time or recurring compensation is offered for the respective use (per either duration or scope of such a use, and often limited to institutional affiliation, etc.). In Closed Access contexts, authors traditionally grant exclusive rights of use to publishers: authors then cannot use or reuse their own content without consent of the publisher.


Deposit licence
The deposit licence of Hochschule für Wirtschaft und Recht Berlin (HWR Berlin) is the contract for publications on the OPUS Publication Server. Via the deposit licence authors determine which rights for reuse they want to grant for their content (e. g., by choosing a CC licence). Further information: Deposit licence of HWR Berlin, OPUS Publication Server of HWR Berlin


Digital Object Identifier (DOI)
A Digital Object Identifier (DOI) uniquely identifies a digital object and functions as a persistent, thus stable and long-lasting, identifier. DOIs are widely relies upon in global academic communication. Open Access content on the OPUS Publication Server of HWR Berlin are given a DOI. Further information: DOI-FAQs


Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB)
The Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB) lists Open Access eBooks that have undergone peer review and adhere to current academic quality standards.


Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)
The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) lists Open Access eJournals that have undergone peer review and adhere to current academic quality standards.


EconStor
EconStor is a genuine Open Access publicationserver for business and economics. EconStor is run by Leibniz-Informationszentrum Wirtschaft (ZBW). Publishing and reading on EconStor is possible free of charge.


Embargo
During an embargo period researchers may not freely publish or otherwise distribute their scientific content (such as publications or (research) data). The duration of such an embargo period is usually determined in a publishing contract. To gain in formation on publishers’ policies and the duration and specifics of their respective embargo periods, the SHERPA/RoMEO database provides a useful overview and good starting point. A further means of information is irights.info as well as this overview via the information platform Open Access.


Hybrid Open Access
Hybrid Open Access means the publication of individual articles via Open Access within subscription journals. This means that the entire journals are paid for via subscriptions while individual articles are also paid for in terms of Artikel Article Processing Charges (APCs). Based on these double revenues (also referred to as double dipping) this business model has come under critique. EU and German funders do not support Hybrid Open Access. Further information: Open Access Business Models


Impact Factor (IF)
The Impact Factor (IF) (or Journal Impact Factor (JIF)) is often employed to describe the impact of an academic journal. The IF is a bibliometric tool and quantifies citations; it does not lend a qualitative assessment. An interesting initiative that critically analyses the IF and other bibliometric measures is the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA).


<intR>²Dok
<intR>²Dok is the Open Access publication server of the Fachinformationsdiensts für internationale und interdisziplinäre Rechtsforschung (specialised information service for international and interdisciplinary legal research) at Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin. <intR>²Dok allows the open and free access to quality assured scientific publications (immediate Open Access and self-archived). One can publish via <intR>²Dok when being affiliated with an scientific institution and when following the publication guidelines of the server.


Non-APC model
Not all Open Access content is financed by individual Article Processing Charges (APCs) or Book Processing Charges (BPCs): also consortia, platforms and academic societies can finance the publication of scientific content. This can be referrred to as non-APC model. Further information: Open Access Business Models


Open Access
Open Access is the worldwide and free access to publicly funded research and resulting articles, books, and other formats of scholarly communication. This desired openness as part of the Open Access context includes financial, legal, as well as technical aspects to ensure a sustainable digital access to scientific information for all interested persons. Further information: [in German] Open-Access-Farbenlehre (Open Access theory of colours)


Open Access Office of Hochschule für Wirtschaft und Recht Berlin
The Open Access Office of Hochschule für Wirtschaft und Recht Berlin provides information and support concerning Open Access endeavours and arising questions.


Open Access Policy
The Academic Senate of HWR Berlin passed the Open Access Policy of HWR Berlin in February 2020. The Open Access Office is working on the strategic implementation of the Open Access Policy; the aim is a comprehensive Open Access infrastructure for HWR Berlin.


Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA)
The Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA) is an international association based in the Netherlands that advocates the interests of Open Access publishers.


Open Access Strategy of Berlin (German: Open-Access-Strategie für Berlin)
The „Open Access Strategy of Berlin“ was adopted in 2015 by the Senate of Berliner and the Berlin House of Representatives. The Strategy includes concrete Open Access goals and describes the envisioned measures to achieve them. One core intent is Open Access to 60 % of the journal articles published by scientific institutions in Berlin by the year of 2020.


Open Educational Resources (OER)
Open Educational Resources (OER) are freely and openly available didactic formats and media. Core elements are the free access and use, as well as the permission to distribute, create derivatives and distribute these as well, under minimal restrictions. Possible formats are course material such as text books, articles, course schedules and multimedia applications. Further information: [mostly in German] OER directories and services


Open Science
Open Science is the free, open, and international scientific scholarly communication enabled and supported by the opportunities presented by digital publishing and communication. Financial, legal, and technical hurdles are minimised to grant scientists a maximum of connectivity and efficacy in their work. (Research) data, software infrastructure and content is intended to be freely accessible and usable for all interested persons. Further information: What is Open Science?


Open Source
Open Source bezeichnet Software, die frei verfügbar ist und deren Programmcode öffentlich eingesehen, genutzt und weiterentwickelt werden kann. Oft schließen sich in bestimmten Themenbereichen Communities zusammen, die gemeinsam Open-Source-Software entwickeln, testen und verbessern. Further information: Open Source Initiative und Open Source FAQ by ifrOSS


OPUS Publication Server
The institutional OPUS Publication Server of Hochschule für Wirtschaft und Recht Berlin (HWR Berlin) is based on the software OPUS. Via the OPUS Publication Server of HWR Berlin scientific publications can be made available. This includes e.g., the publication series of HWR Berlin, scientific articles in the form of self-archiving, reports of research projects at HWR Berlin, academic content created by professors of HWR Berlin, and final thesis of students of HWR Berlin with a recommendation for publication. The Deposit licence and the Leitlinien zur Veröffentlichung auf dem OPUS-Publikationsserver der Hochschule für Wirtschaft und Recht Berlin (i.e. Guidelines for publishing on the the OPUS Publication Server of HWR Berlin; document in German) detail the conditions for such a publication.


ORCiD
ORCiD is a worldwide unique identifier for persons interested in clearly attributing their research and academic work to themselves. Many researchers carry the same (or very similar) names, change affiliations during the course of their careers (including changing their work email-address and other contact data) or change their names due to private reasons. ORCiD provides the possibility for researchers to attribute clearly scientific contributions, code and software, grant and project applications and other forms of scientific activities. Creating and making use of an ORCiD is highly recommendable for researchers. Further information: ORCiD


Peer review
Peer review the process of evaluation of a scientific work by other scientists (‘peers’) who are active in the same or a similar field of research. The principles of Open Peer Review (OPR) increasingly are brought forward as the traditional peer review process receives criticism. OPR signifies a democratic, constructive form of public feedback. Further information: What is open peer review?


Publisher’s version (German: Verlagsversion)
The authors’s version (post-print) of a scientific article is the version that exists after all modifications to its content have been completed (thus, after editing and peer review). The publisher’s version then also includes the formal and technical requirements of the respective journal or publishing institution. Also refer to post-print and pre-print.


Publishing contract
In publishing contracts or agreements scientists and scientific publishers (or other authors and publishing institutions) agree on the conditions (rights and duties) for publication of a specific work or content. Central to these agreements or contracts are the rights for reuse of the respective work or content. Authors can work towards suitable formulations and additions that allow them to maintain their own rights of (re-)use of their own work or content, e.g., by making use of the SPARC Author Addendum.


Post-print (author version; German: Autorenversion, akzeptierte Manuskriptversion)
A post-print (or author version) of a scientific article is the version that exists after all modifications to its content have been completed (thus, after editing and peer review). The post-print usually is congruent content-wise with the published version; however, it may differ in terms of layout and minor aspects such as spelling etc. Also refer to pre-print.


Predatory publishers
Predatory publishers are organisations that concentrate on monetary gains (e.g., via Article Processing Charges (APCs) or other payments. Authors can publish almost any document without this content having to undergo quality checks. While this does not necessarily lower the academic quality of the respective content, predatory publishers are still not a recommended channel for academic communication. Further information: FAQs on „Predatory Publishing“ [in German] and Think. Check. Submit.


Pre-print (German: Manuskriptversion)
A pre-print (or manuscript version) of a scientific article is the version that is submitted for publication; the pre-print is the basis for the later post-print and publisher version. Some pre-prints are also published via institutional and disciplinary repositories so that researchers can claim early authorship, communicate their ideas in a timely manner, and receive feedback along the writing and researching process.


Primary Open Access publication (German: Erstveröffentlichung) (Gold Open Access)
Following the Golden Path to Open Access means publishing scientific content immediately and freely accessibly, e.g. within an Open Access journal or as an Open Access book. This can be financed via Article Processing Charges (APCs), Book Processing Charges (BPCs) or in the so-called Non-APC-Modell. Further information: Open Access strategies


Print on demand (PoD)
Freely digitally available (scientific) resources can be printed on demand (Print-on-demand, PoD). Some publishers offer this additional and chargeable service or offer the possibility to order a printed version via a third-party supplier.


Project DEAL
Project DEAL strives for Germany-wide license contracts for its participating members (e.g. universities and libraries) with leading scientific publishers. The goal is to transform this cooperation in the direction of more Open Access.


Public Library of Science (PLOS)
The Public Library of Science (PLOS) strives for building a global infrastructure for Open Access publications. Among other activities, the organisation publishes Open Access journals, such as PLOS ONE. These journals do not only cover a wide range of topics and disciplines, provide high-quality academic information, but also include publications with so-called “negative results” which provides a fruitful addition to scientific diversity.


Research data
As described by the DFG “[r]esearch data might include measurement data, laboratory values, audiovisual information, texts, survey data, objects from collections, or samples that were created, developed or evaluated during scientific work. Methodical forms of testing such as questionnaires, software and simulations may also produce important results for scientific research and should therefore also be categorised as research data.” Further information: Open Access for research data und Open Data, Open Access and reusability.


Research data management (RDM)
Research data management (RDM) consists of several steps that can be undertaken to ensure the collection, documentation and archiving of research data; following the FAIR data principles is very recommendable in this context. Further information: Forschungsdaten.org [in German]


Self-archiving (Green Open Access)
Publications that have already been published in Closed Access, i.e. not freely accessible, can often be published via self-archiving in a repository after a certain period of time has elapsed (the so-called embargo period). This form of self-archiving can also be referred to as the Green Path of Open Access; self-archiving can usually be accomplished with the help of a publication server (repository), such as the OPUS Publication Server of Hochschule für Wirtschaft und Recht Berlin (HWR Berlin). Alongside the conditions in publisher policies on Open Access there is the German Right to self-archive, dt. Zweitveröffentlichungsrecht: it allows authors to self-archive when certain criteria are met. An interesting hub for information on this is: irights.info [in German; but for most resources a “translate” option is available], as well as this overview of openaccess.net. Since the interpretation of publishing contracts and the application of said law (Zweitveröffentlichungsrecht) can be quite complex, the Open Access Office of HWR Berlin offers support with questions in this context.


Serials crisis (German: Zeitschriftenkrise)
With the so-called serials crisis describes the predicament in which many academic libraries and other scientific institutions are caught up in: depending on publishers for access to scientific content and at the same time being unable to cater for the increasingly expensive subscription costs for academic journals with declining budgets.


SHERPA Juliet
SHERPA Juliet is an online database that can be consulted for information on the Open Access criteria funders require in their guidelines. Interested researchers and institutions can gather information on Open Access regulations for primary Open Access publications as well as self-archiving Open Access. SHERPA means “Securing a Hybrid Environment for Research Preservation and Access”; SHERPA Juliet adds to the service SHERPA RoMEO. Further information: SHERPA Juliet


SHERPA RoMEO
SHERPA RoMEO is an online database that can be consulted for information on publisher’s policies on self-archiving via (institutional) repositories. SHERPA means “Securing a Hybrid Environment for Research Preservation and Access”; SHERPA RoMEO is complementary to the service SHERPA Juliet. Further information: SHERPA RoMEO


Social networks
Social networks for researchers, such as Academia.edu and ResearchGate offer connecting and information possibilities. These networks are not, however, suitable as Open Access repositories. Further information: A social networking site is not an open access repository.


Subscriptions
Subscriptions are fees that libraries, institutions or sometimes even individuals pay to publishers and other information companies to access (information) resources. Most academic publications are still only available via subscriptions (see Closed Access); however, more and more a transition towards Open Access is occurring.


Think. Check. Submit.
With the help of the checklist ”Think. Check. Submit.” one can probe into the (academic) quality of an (Open Access) journal to decide whether one trusts the journal and wants to publish one’s research with them.


Uniform Resource Name (URN)
A Uniform Resource Name (URN) is a unique and persistent identifier for digital objects. All publications on the OPUS Publication Server of Hochschule für Wirtschaft und Recht Berlin are assigned a URN (or a DOI, see DOI).


Unpaywall
The free, legal and Open Source browser plugin Unpaywall allows all interested persons to find freely available Open Access content when researching with their browser. The initiative calls itself Unpaywall (thus, the opposite of a paywall) to allow widespread access to academic information. Paywalls are being overcome in legal and global ways by providing access to all available resources hosted in Open Access repositories world-wide; DOI interfaces are used for this process.


Zenodo
The universal repository Zenodo supports international scientific communication by allowing researchers to upload and share different academic formats such as publications, research data, software etc. All content on Zenodo receives DOIs and can therefore persistently be identified and archived.


This glossary is partly based on information derived from the following sources and information on Open Access:
[in German] Das Zweitveröffentlichungsrecht (Open Access) der CLARIN-D
[in German] DeepGreen-Projekt
FAQs Directory of Open Access Journals des DOAJ
[in German] Frequently asked Questions zu Open Access und Zweitveröffentlichungsrecht der Allianz der deutschen Wissenschaftsorganisationen
[in German] Glossar des Abgeordnetenhauses Berlin: Open-Access-Strategie für Berlin
[in German] Glossar zur Open-Access-Policy der TU Berlin
[in German] Informationen zum Förderprogramm „Open Access Publizieren“ der DFG
Information platform Open Access
[in German] iRIGHTS.info-Leitfaden: Folgen, Risiken und Nebenwirkungen der Bedingung »nicht-kommerziell – NC« von Paul Klimpel
[in German] Journal Impact Factor des iFQ
[in German] Offsetting-Verträge-Präsentation von Bernhard Mittermaier
[in German] Open Access in Deutschland. Die Strategie des Bundesministeriums für Bildung und Forschung des BMBF
Open Access Overview by Peter Suber
Open Research Glossary by Jon Tennant und Ross Mounce
[in German] Praxishandbuch Open Access herausgegeben von Konstanze Söllner und Bernhard Mittermaier
[in German] Umgang mit Forschungsdaten: DFG-Leitlinien zum Umgang mit Forschungsdaten
[in German] Vorteile und Herausforderungen: Open Access an der TU Berlin

Latest Update: 4th November 2019

Open Access Policy of HWR Berlin


The Academic Senate of HWR Berlin passed the Open Access Policy of HWR Berlin in February 2020. The Open Access Office is working on the strategic implementation of the Open Access Policy; the aim is a comprehensive Open Access infrastructure for HWR Berlin.

Open Access support
Guidelines for publishing on the the OPUS Publication Server of HWR Berlin
Regulations on data protection for the OPUS Publication Server at HWR Berlin

The Hochschule für Wirtschaft und Recht Berlin (HWR Berlin) focuses on data protection and the EU-wide general data protection regulation (GDPR). The Regulations on data protection for the OPUS Publication Server at HWR Berlin document the use of personal data in the context of the OPUS Publication Server.

Documentation

The OPUS Publication Server is based on OPUS 4. OPUS 4 is documented here.
The OPUS Publication Server of HWR Berlin is run by the Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund Berlin-Brandenburg (KOBV) concerning its technical components.

Imprint

Hochschule für Wirtschaft und Recht
Library
hsb.cs@hwr-berlin.de
+49(0)30 30877-1238 - Anja Rosenbaum
+49(0)30 30877-1288 - Cornelia Rupp

The Hochschule für Wirtschaft und Recht Berlin is a public corporation and is represented by president Prof. Dr. Andreas Zaby.

Hochschulbibliothek Campus Schöneberg

Hochschule für Wirtschaft und Recht
Library Campus Schöneberg
opus@hwr-berlin.de
+49(0)30 30877-1238 - Anja Rosenbaum
+49(0)30 30877-1288 - Cornelia Rupp

Open-Access-Office of HWR