The search result changed since you submitted your search request. Documents might be displayed in a different sort order.
  • search hit 1 of 1089
Back to Result List

Steering actors through a virtual set employing vibro-tactile feedback

  • Actors in virtual studio productions are faced with the challenge that they have to interact with invisible virtual objects because these elements are rendered separately and combined with the real image later in the production process. Virtual sets typically use static virtual elements or animated objects with predefined behavior so that actors can practice their performance and errors can be corrected in the post production. With the demand for inexpensive live recording and interactive TV productions, virtual objects will be dynamically rendered at arbitrary positions that cannot be predicted by the actor. Perceptive aids have to be employed to support a natural interaction with these objects. In our work we study the effect of haptic feedback for a simple form of interaction. Actors are equipped with a custom built haptic belt and get vibrotactile feedback during a small navigational task (path following). We present a prototype of a wireless vibrotactile feedback device and aActors in virtual studio productions are faced with the challenge that they have to interact with invisible virtual objects because these elements are rendered separately and combined with the real image later in the production process. Virtual sets typically use static virtual elements or animated objects with predefined behavior so that actors can practice their performance and errors can be corrected in the post production. With the demand for inexpensive live recording and interactive TV productions, virtual objects will be dynamically rendered at arbitrary positions that cannot be predicted by the actor. Perceptive aids have to be employed to support a natural interaction with these objects. In our work we study the effect of haptic feedback for a simple form of interaction. Actors are equipped with a custom built haptic belt and get vibrotactile feedback during a small navigational task (path following). We present a prototype of a wireless vibrotactile feedback device and a small framework for evaluating haptic feedback in a virtual set environment. Results from an initial pilot study indicate that vibrotactile feedback is a suitable non-visual aid for interaction that is at least comparable to audio-visual alternatives used in virtual set productions.show moreshow less

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar
Metadaten
Author:Björn Wöldecke, Tom Vierjahn, Matthias Flasko, Jens HerderORCiDGND, Christian Geiger
Fachbereich/Einrichtung:Hochschule Düsseldorf / Fachbereich - Medien
Document Type:Conference Proceeding
Year of Completion:2009
Language:English
Publisher:ACM
Place of publication:New York
Parent Title (English):TEI '09 Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction
First Page:169
Last Page:174
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1145/1517664.1517703
Related URL:https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1517703
ISBN:978-1-60558-493-5
Tag:FHD
interaction in virtual sets; navigation aids; tactile feedback
Licence (German):keine Lizenz - nur Metadaten
Release Date:2019/01/11