• search hit 1 of 3
Back to Result List

Land-use/land-cover change (LUCC) in the context of an agricultural frontier in the southern Ecuadorian Amazon: A multiscale and interethnic perspective

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:29-opus4-125548
  • LUCC (Land-Use/Land-Cover Change) is commonly addressed as a spatial manifestation of human activities and reveals the impact of diverse factors at different spatial and temporal scales (REID ET AL. 2010, LAMBIN ET AL. 2003). The complexity of these changes is particularly evident in agricultural frontier areas (RINDFUSS ET AL. 2007, PICHÓN 1997, REBORATTI 1990). Due to their population dynamics, these areas stand out for fluidity and change (GEIGER 2009, RINDFUSS ET AL. 2007) and thus represent places of co-production and reconfiguration of power and culture (TSING 2005). This ultimately influences ways of thinking, uses of space and resources and associated local practices (RUEDA 2013).LUCC (Land-Use/Land-Cover Change) is commonly addressed as a spatial manifestation of human activities and reveals the impact of diverse factors at different spatial and temporal scales (REID ET AL. 2010, LAMBIN ET AL. 2003). The complexity of these changes is particularly evident in agricultural frontier areas (RINDFUSS ET AL. 2007, PICHÓN 1997, REBORATTI 1990). Due to their population dynamics, these areas stand out for fluidity and change (GEIGER 2009, RINDFUSS ET AL. 2007) and thus represent places of co-production and reconfiguration of power and culture (TSING 2005). This ultimately influences ways of thinking, uses of space and resources and associated local practices (RUEDA 2013). Agricultural frontier areas are spaces of encounter where ethnicity, as a socially constructed difference between ―us‖ and ―others‖ (ESCOBAR 2010, GIMÉNEZ 2006, BARTH 1974, COHEN 1974) is spatially evident and configures certain contexts of resource management (UNRUH ET AL. 2005). There, established land-use practices change through knowledge exchange. The progressive colonization of these areas has substantial consequences for (forest) ecosystems and pose new challenges for the local population in terms of their livelihoods. Since LUCC and deforestation in tropical forest areas cannot be explained exclusively by demographic changes (e.g. WALKER 2006, BARBIERI ET AL. 2005, PERZ AND WALKER 2002), a household-level analysis enables a differentiated understanding of land-use change. Following a household lifecycles approach (WALKER ET AL. 2002), it can be assumed that land-use practices are also determined by a household‘s composition and the demographic characteristics of its members. In addition, individual and collective values regarding behavior in the management of land use play a role and can foster changes in both the use of resources (JONES ET AL. 2016, RAMCILOVIC-SUOMINEN ET AL. 2013, GEIST AND LAMBIN 2002, SYDENSTRICKER-NETO 2002, BRIASSOULIS 2000, BENGSTON AND XU 1996) and the social organization of the local population (SPEELMAN ET AL. 2013). This study is concerned with LUCC in the Alto Nangaritza Valley in the southern Ecuadorian Amazon, a traditional settlement area of the indigenous Shuar group, to where immigrant Mestizos and Saraguros from the Andean region have arrived. By means of a multiscale approach, the aim was to enhance the understanding of the interactions of LUCC at agricultural frontiers, from both a meso- and a micro-scale perspective. Taking a mixed methods approach, quantitative and qualitative research methods were applied. The mesoscale study was carried out over 35 years, using techniques of photointerpretation (IGM) and the classification of satellite images (Eyefind RESA - RapidEye) in the years 1978, 1986, 2000, 2010, 2013. For this purpose, the percentages of space taken up by different land-use/land-cover classes (forest, pastures, tree clearing/crops and settlement/road) and their annual rate of change were calculated and compared. Subsequently, based on census data (INEC) from 1990, 2001 and 2010, population development was analyzed, and colonization phases associated with LUCC were identified. Thus, spatial changes in forest cover and the conversion of land into more extensive and intensive uses as a result of colonization processes could be assessed. In order to capture land-use changes at the microscale, semi-structured expert interviews (8 individuals), structured household questionnaires and participatory workshops (26 households) were conducted during three fieldwork phases in 2014, 2015 and 2016. The data gathered from the household questionnaires were statistically processed by means of Microsoft Excel and SPSS, statements from the expert interviews were coded inductively and subjected to a qualitative content analysis. The analysis of land uses (forest, pastures, aja/huerta-forest garden and commercial crops) and practices at household level was based on the five lifecycle stages, related to the number and age of household members (CEPAL 2006, WALKER 2006), and supplemented by their settlement duration (VANWEY ET AL. 2005, MCCRACKEN ET AL. 1999). In order to assess the values ascribed by the different ethnic groups, the concept of forest values (BENGSTON AND XU 1996) was extended to include further land-use classes and to develop my own analytical framework for land-use values. For this purpose, land-use values were gathered inductively by means of the tools of free listing (BERNARD 2006, THOMPSON AND JUAN 2006, QUINLAN 2005) and likert scale ranking (SPENCE AND OWENS 2011, BERNARD 2006) in the participatory workshops, and analyzed later by calculating their salience index (THOMPSON AND JUAN 2006, SUTROP 2001, SMITH AND BORGATTI 1997, SMITH 1993). At a mesoscale, the land-use/land-cover results indicate that the total area of forest decreased from about 94% in 1978 to ca. 71% in 2013. Although forest represented the largest land cover in the region during this period, the proportion of pasture increased from 5.5% to 22%. Associated with the construction and operation of the road in the Alto Nangaritza in 2010, both land-cover classes showed higher annual rates of change between 2010 and 2013, with maximum values of -2.65% yr-1 for forests and 8% yr-1 for pastures. At the same time, besides the extensive use of land, areas under intensive cultivation also changed the landscape. They increased proportionately from 0.4% in 1978 to almost 7% in 2013. A comparison of average annual rates of change (1978-2013) showed that these were higher for cropland under intensive management (7.8% yr-1) than for pasture (3.9% yr-1). At this scale, it becomes evident that the increase in extensive and intensive market-oriented land use has resulted in local forest loss, which is closely linked to immigration during different phases of colonization. At a microscale, the percentages of land use corresponding to the five household lifecycle stages (MCCRACKEN ET AL. 1999) revealed the influence of other factors. In the early stages (I, II, III), forest areas decreased and pastures increased, up to a turning point, whereas in the later stages (IV, V) the forest recovered. While changes in forest and pasture areas relate more to the demand for, and availability of, the household workforce, the main drivers of change identified in the aja/huerta encompassed households‘ food needs and the income available for food purchase besides what they produced themselves. Decision-making and land management of the aja/huerta are womens‘ responsibility. Growing commercial crops primarily depends on the financial situation of households, which have to raise enough money to finance agricultural production. The factor size of the managed areas affects all types of land use as well as the percentage allocated to each type on the farm. Moreover, ownership and rights of use, largely determined by ethnicity, also affect the uses of land. The analysis of land-use values developed in this research provided insights into what different local groups consider to be good or desirable in terms of land-use types. Considering values in the LUCC research reveals the subjectivity, interests, and preferences that are behind local peoples‘ land-use decisions. Concerning forest and aja/huerta a wide variety of values was named, including life support, environment/biodiversity, economic and spiritual values, by both the Shuar and the colonizing Mestizos and Saraguros. The assignment of these values plays an important role in households‘ decisions regarding land use. Characteristics such as food security or nature conservation are particularly highlighted in the forest and aja/huerta categories, while an economic value that prioritizes saleability is given by all groups to pasture and commercial crops. Concerning knowledge exchange in the Alto Nangaritza Valley, it, on the one hand, enabled new settlers to survive under different environmental conditions: they gained local experience of how to minimize economic risk and ensured food security by adopting proven agricultural techniques. On the other hand, the flow of knowledge spurred the Shuar into adapting land use practices and using market-oriented production techniques. Power asymmetries within the internal colonization matrix (matriz de colonialismo interno, ESPINOSA 2017, JARRÍN ET AL. 2016) and the perceived superiority of the colonists (PARK 2012) led to the adoption by the Shuar of certain techniques, considered more effective, especially to satisfy the market demands. In this case, market-oriented production, which requires the use of similar techniques, levels off common ethnic-cultural differences in land-use practices between groups, offering to the native group a possible niche in the market and social participation in the nation-state, even marginally. In sum, the example of the Alto Nangaritza Valley shows how a multiscale approach to the analysis of LUCC makes a valuable contribution. At a mesoscale, spatial changes in land use and its relation to immigration processes could be captured and presented, while a household-level analysis provided a comprehensive understanding of land-use dynamics, influenced in different ways by internal and external factors throughout the stages of the lifecycle. These results support previous empirical evidence regarding non-linearity (VANWEY 2006, PERZ ET AL. 2005) in land use change. Furthermore, this research highlights the importance of land-use values as a framework of analysis in future resource-related studies and assessments in different spatial contexts. Finally, the successful implementation and widespread acceptance of land-use policies and conservation measures, therefore, require an integrative consideration of various scales. For this purpose, sensitivity to concepts of ethnicity is necessary and can be achieved by means of the active inclusion and participation of local people, exploring their perceptions, and land-use practices, as well as their household dynamics.show moreshow less
  • Landnutzungs-/Landbedeckungswandel (LUCC: Land Use/Land-Cover Change) wird häufig als räumliche Manifestation menschlicher Aktivitäten betrachtet und offenbart die Folgen von sozial-ökologischen Transformationen auf unterschiedlichen räumlichen und zeitlichen Maßstabsebenen (REID ET AL. 2010, LAMBIN ET AL. 2003). Die Komplexität dieser Veränderungen wird besonders in Agrarkolonisationsgebieten (RINDFUSS ET AL. 2007, PICHÓN 1997, REBORATTI 1990) deutlich. Aufgrund ihrer Bevölkerungsdynamik stehen sie für Fluidität und Wandel (GEIGER 2009, RINDFUSS ET AL. 2007) und stellen somit Orte der Koproduktion und Neukonfiguration von Macht und Kultur (TSING 2005) dar. Dadurch werden schließlichLandnutzungs-/Landbedeckungswandel (LUCC: Land Use/Land-Cover Change) wird häufig als räumliche Manifestation menschlicher Aktivitäten betrachtet und offenbart die Folgen von sozial-ökologischen Transformationen auf unterschiedlichen räumlichen und zeitlichen Maßstabsebenen (REID ET AL. 2010, LAMBIN ET AL. 2003). Die Komplexität dieser Veränderungen wird besonders in Agrarkolonisationsgebieten (RINDFUSS ET AL. 2007, PICHÓN 1997, REBORATTI 1990) deutlich. Aufgrund ihrer Bevölkerungsdynamik stehen sie für Fluidität und Wandel (GEIGER 2009, RINDFUSS ET AL. 2007) und stellen somit Orte der Koproduktion und Neukonfiguration von Macht und Kultur (TSING 2005) dar. Dadurch werden schließlich Denkweisen Nutzungen von Land und Ressourcen und damit assoziierte Nutzungspraktiken beeinflusst (RUEDA 2013) beeinflusst. Agrarkolonisationsgebiete sind Begegnungsräume, in denen Ethnizität als soziale Konstruktion der Unterscheidung zwischen dem wir und den anderen (ESCOBAR 2010, GIMÉNEZ 2006, BARTH 1974, COHEN 1974) räumlich wirksam wird und bestimmte Kontexte des Umgangs mit Ressourcen konfiguriert werden (UNRUH ET AL. 2005). Durch Wissensaustausch ändern sich dort etablierte Landnutzungspraktiken. Mit der fortschreitenden Besiedlung dieser Gebiete gehen tiefgreifende sozial-ökologische Transformationsprozesse einher, die erhebliche Folgen für (Wald)Ökosysteme haben und die Lokalbevölkerung vor neue Herausforderungen in Bezug auf ihre Überlebenssicherung stellen. LUCC und Entwaldung in tropischen Waldgebieten lassen sich jedoch nicht ausschließlich mit demographischen Veränderungen erklären (Z.B. WALKER 2006, BARBIERI ET AL. 2005, PERZ UND WALKER 2002). Insbesondere eine Analyse auf der Ebene lokaler Haushalte ermöglicht ein differenziertes Verständnis von Landnutzungsveränderungen. Dem Ansatz der household lifecycles (WALKER ET AL. 2002) folgend, kann davon ausgegangen werden, dass Landnutzungspraktiken auch von der Haushaltszusammensetzung und den demografischen Merkmalen der Mitglieder bestimmt werden. Zudem spielen individuelle und kollektive Werte bezüglich des Verhaltens im Umgang mit Landnutzungsformen eine Rolle und können Veränderungen in der Ressourcennutzung (JONES ET AL. 2016, RAMCILOVIC-SUOMINEN ET AL. 2013, GEIST UND LAMBIN 2002, SYDENSTRICKER-NETO 2002, BRIASSOULIS 2000, BENGSTON UND XU 1996) und sozialen Organisation der Lokalbevölkerung (SPEELMAN ET AL. 2013) herbeiführen. Diese Forschungsarbeit befasst sich mit LUCC im Tal des Alto Nangaritza im Amazonasgebiet Südecuadors, einem ursprünglichen Siedlungsgebiet der indigenen Gruppe der Shuar, das aufgrund der Zuwanderung von Mestizen und Saraguros aus den Gebirgsregionen tiefgreifenden sozial-ökologischen Wandlungsprozessen unterliegt. Ziel ist es, durch Anwendung eines Mehrebenenansatzes die Wechselbeziehungen zwischen mesoskaligen und mikroskaligen Perspektiven auf LUCC in Agrarkolonisationsgebieten besser zu verstehen. Einem Mixed Methods Ansatz folgend, kamen quantitative und qualitative Forschungsmethoden zum Einsatz. Die Untersuchung des LUCC auf Mesoebene erfolgte über einen Zeitraum von 35 Jahren mit Hilfe von Luftbildinterpretationen (IGM) und Satellitenbildanalysen (Eyefind RESA - RapidEye) in den Jahren 1978, 1986, 2000, 2010, 2013. Dazu wurde der prozentuale Flächenanteil und die jährliche Änderungsrate der Landnutzungs/-bedeckungsklassen Wald (forest), Weide (pasture), gerodetes Land/Anbaufläche (Tree clearing/crops) und Siedlungsfläche/Straßen (settlements/roads) berechnet und vergleichend betrachtet. Anschließend wurde die Bevölkerungsentwicklung anhand der Zensusdaten von 1990, 2001 und 2010 (INEC) analysiert und Besiedlungsphasen identifiziert, die mit den LUCC in Verbindung stehen. Somit konnten räumliche Veränderungen hinsichtlich der Waldbedeckung und Umwandlung von Land in extensivere und intensivere Landnutzungsformen in Folge von Besiedlungsprozessen bewertet werden. Um die Mikroebene von Landnutzungsveränderungen zu erfassen, wurden während drei Feldphasen in den Jahren 2014, 2015 und 2016, semistrukturierte Expert*inneninterviews (8), strukturierte Haushaltsbefragungen und partizipative Workshops (26 Haushalte) sowie informelle Hintergrundgespräche (6) duchgeführt. Die generierten Daten aus den Haushaltsbefragungen wurden mit Microsoft-Excel und SPSS statistisch ausgewertet, die Aussagen aus den Expert*inneninterviews induktiv kodiert und einer qualitativen Inhaltsanalyse unterzogen. Als Analyserahmen der Landnutzungstypen (Wald, Weide, Aja/Huerta-Hausgarten, Nutzpflanzen für den Verkauf) und der Landnutzungspraktiken auf Haushaltsebene dienten die fünf Lebenszyklusstadien basierend auf Anzahl und Alter der Haushaltsmitglieder (CEPAL 2006, WALKER 2006), ergänzt durch ihre Siedlungsdauer (VANWEY ET AL. 2005, MCCRACKEN ET AL. 1999). Um die Wertzuschreibungen der verschiedenen ethnischen Gruppen zu erfassen, wurde das Konzept der forest values nach BENGSTON UND XU (1996) um weitere Landnutzungsformen erweitert und ein eigener Analyserahmen zu Landnutzungswerten (land-use values) erarbeitet. Dafür wurden Bewertungen von Nutzungen im Rahmen der partizipativen Workshops mit Hilfe der Methodentools free listing (BERNARD 2006, THOMPSON UND JUAN 2006, QUINLAN 2005) und Likert scale ranking (SPENCE UND OWENS 2011, BERNARD 2006) induktiv erhoben und mittels salience index (THOMPSON UND JUAN 2006, SUTROP 2001, SMITH UND BORGATTI 1997, SMITH 1993) analysiert. Ergebnisse der flächenmäßigen LUCC auf Mesoebene zeigen, dass die Waldfläche mit einem Anteil an der Gesamtfläche von etwa 94% im Jahr 1978 auf etwa 71% im Jahr 2013 zurückging. Wenngleich der Wald in diesem Zeitraum die größte Landbedeckungsklasse in der Region darstellte, nahm der Anteil der Weidefläche von 5,5% auf 22% zu. Als Folge des Straßenausbaus im Alto Nangaritza-Tal und deren Fertigstellung im Jahr 2010 ergaben sich für beide Landbedeckungsklassen höhere jährliche Änderungsraten mit Höchstwerten von -2,65% für Wald und 8% für Weiden zwischen 2010 und 2013. Gleichzeitig haben neben extensiver Landnutzung auch Ackerflächen mit intensiver Bewirtschaftung die Landschaft verändert. Sie stiegen anteilig von 0,4% im Jahr 1978 auf fast 7% im Jahr 2013. Der Vergleich der durchschnittlichen jährlichen Änderungsraten (1978-2013) zeigte, dass diese bei den Ackerflächen mit intensiver Bewirtschaftung (7,8%/Jahr) höher lag als bei den Weideflächen (3,9%/Jahr). Auf dieser Untersuchungsebene wird ersichtlich, dass die Zunahme der extensiven und intensiven marktorientierten Landnutzung zu lokalen Waldverlusten führte und diese Entwicklungen mit der Zuwanderung von Bevölkerung in unterschiedlichen Besiedlungsphasen bis heute eng verknüpft sind. Auf Mikroebene ergab die Analyse der aggregierten prozentualen Flächenanteile der Landnutzungstypen während der fünf Lebenszyklusstadien der Haushalte (MCCRACKEN ET AL. 1999), dass Nutzungsarten von bestimmten Faktoren unterschiedlich stark beeinflusst werden. In den frühen Stadien (I, II, III) nahmen zunächst die Waldflächen ab und Weideflächen zu, bis diese Entwicklung schließlich einen Wendepunkt erreichte und sich der Wald auf den Nutzflächen in den späteren Stadien (IV, V) wieder erholte. Während Veränderungen bei Wald und Weiden eher mit dem Arbeitskräftebedarf und deren Verfügbarkeit in Verbindung stehen, konnten bei Ajas/Huertas vor allem der Nahrungsmittelbedarf der Haushaltsmitglieder, deren Einkommensverfügbarkeit und der dadurch mögliche Erwerb von Nahrungsmitteln außerhalb der eigenen Produktion als wichtigster Treiber des Wandels identifiziert werden. Die Bewirtschaftung der Aja/Huerta liegt im Verantwortungsbereich der Frauen, die Entscheidungen über das Management treffen. Der Anbau von Nutzpflanzen für den Verkauf ist vorrangig von der finanziellen Situation der Haushalte abhängig, welche die Kosten für die landwirtschaftliche Produktion tragen. Der Faktor der Größe der bewirtschafteten Flächen wirkt sich auf alle Nutzungstypen sowie deren prozentualen Flächenanteil aus. Schließlich beeinflussen Besitzverhältnisse und Nutzungsrechte die Landnutzung. Diese werden in hohem Maße von der ethnischen Herkunft bestimmt. Die Analyse der im Rahmen dieser Forschungsarbeit eigens entwickelten Landnutzungswerte (land-use values) lieferte Aussagen darüber, was aus Sicht der verschiedenen Bevölkerungsgruppen hinsichtlich der Landnutzungstypen gut oder wünschenswert ist. Dem Wald und der Aja/huerta wird eine große Vielfalt von Werten zugeschrieben (z.B. Lebenserhaltung, Umwelt/Biodiversitätsschutz, wirtschaftlicher oder spiritueller Wert), sowohl von den Shuar als auch von den zugewanderten Mestizen und Saraguros. Diese Wertzuschreibungen spielen bei den Haushaltsentscheidungen bezüglich der Landnutzung eine wichtige Rolle. Insbesondere Eigenschaften wie Nahrungssicherung oder Naturschutz werden bei den Kategorien Wald und Aja/huerta herausgestellt, während Weiden und Nutzpflanzen für den Verkauf von allen Gruppen vorrangig ein ökonomischer Wert beigemessen wird. Hinsichtlich des Wissensaustauschs im Alto Nangaritza-Tal konnte gezeigt werden, dass dieser einerseits den neuen Siedlern ermöglichte, unter anderen Umweltbedingungen zu überleben und lokale Erfahrungen zu sammeln, um so das wirtschaftliche Risiko zu minimieren und sich erprobte landwirtschaftliche Techniken für ihre Ernährungssicherheit anzueignen. Bei den Shuar führte der Wissensfluss andererseits dazu, dass sie Landnutzungspraktiken adaptieren und Techniken für die marktorientierte Produktion einsetzen konnten. Machtasymmetrien innerhalb der Kolonisationsmatrix (matriz de colonialismo interno, ESPINOSA 2017, JARRÍN ET AL. 2016) und eine daraus resultierende Überlegenheit der Siedler führten schließlich dazu, dass bestimmte Techniken von den Shuar als effektiver empfunden wurden, vor allem um Marktanforderungen zu erfüllen und dadurch soziale Teilhabe im Nationalstaat zu erlangen. Insbesondere die ethnische Zugehörigkeit wird als politisches Instrument zur Einbeziehung kollektiver kultureller und territorialer Ansprüche angesehen. Die marktwirtschaftliche Produktion dagegen nivelliert ethnisch-kulturell tradierte Unterschiede in Landnutzungspraktiken. Zusammenfassend kann am Beispiel des Alto Nangaritza-Tals der Mehrwert eines Mehrebenenansatzes bei der Analyse von LUCC gezeigt werden. Während auf der Mesoebene die räumlichen Landnutzungsveränderungen und deren Zusammenhang mit Zuwanderungsprozessen erfasst und dargestellt werden konnte, lieferte insbesondere die Betrachtung der Haushaltsebene ein differenziertes Verständnis hinsichtlich der Landnutzungsdynamiken, die von internen und externen Faktoren im Laufe der Lebenszyklusstadien unterschiedlich beeinflusst werden. Diese Ergebnisse stützen frühere empirische Erhebungen hinsichtlich der Nichtlinearität (non-linearity, VANWEY 2006, PERZ ET AL. 2005) von Landnutzungsveränderungen. Der in dieser Arbeit entwickelte Analyserahmen unterstreicht die Notwendigkeit, land-use values in zukünftigen Analysen und Bewertungen von Ressourcennutzung in unterschiedlichen räumlichen Kontexten zu berücksichtigen. Eine erfolgreiche Umsetzung und breite Akzeptanz von Landnutzungspolitiken und Schutzmaßnahmen erfordern deshalb die integrative Betrachtung verschiedener Maßstabsebenen. Dazu ist eine Sensibilisierung für ethnische Zugehörigkeiten unerlässlich, die durch den aktiven Einbezug lokaler Bevölkerungsgruppen, deren Sichtweisen und Landnutzungspraktiken sowie Dynamiken in Haushalten erreicht werden kann.show moreshow less
  • El cambio de uso y cobertura del suelo (LUCC, Land-Use/Land-Cover Change) se aborda generalmente como una manifestación espacial de las actividades humanas y revela el impacto de diversos factores a diferentes escalas espaciales y temporales (REID ET AL. 2010, LAMBIN ET AL. 2003). La complejidad de estos cambios es particularmente evidente en las áreas de frontera agrícola (RINDFUSS ET AL. 2007, PICHÓN 1997, REBORATTI 1990). Debido a su dinámica poblacional, representan fluidez y cambio (GEIGER 2009, RINDFUSS ET AL. 2007), por lo tanto, constituyen lugares de coproducción y reconfiguración del poder y la cultura (TSING 2005), lo cual en última instancia influye en las formas de pensar y enEl cambio de uso y cobertura del suelo (LUCC, Land-Use/Land-Cover Change) se aborda generalmente como una manifestación espacial de las actividades humanas y revela el impacto de diversos factores a diferentes escalas espaciales y temporales (REID ET AL. 2010, LAMBIN ET AL. 2003). La complejidad de estos cambios es particularmente evidente en las áreas de frontera agrícola (RINDFUSS ET AL. 2007, PICHÓN 1997, REBORATTI 1990). Debido a su dinámica poblacional, representan fluidez y cambio (GEIGER 2009, RINDFUSS ET AL. 2007), por lo tanto, constituyen lugares de coproducción y reconfiguración del poder y la cultura (TSING 2005), lo cual en última instancia influye en las formas de pensar y en las prácticas locales de uso del espacio y los recursos (RUEDA 2013). Las áreas de frontera agrícola son espacios de encuentro en los que la etnicidad, como construcción social de la diferencia entre ―nosotros‖ y ―los otros‖ (ESCOBAR 2010, GIMÉNEZ 2006, BARTH 1974, COHEN 1974), se manifiesta espacialmente y configura ciertos contextos de manejo de recursos (UNRUH ET AL. 2005). Precisamente allí, prácticas establecidas de uso del suelo cambian por medio del intercambio de conocimientos. La colonización progresiva de estas áreas tiene consecuencias significativas para los ecosistemas (forestales) y que plantean nuevos desafíos para la población local para garantizar su supervivencia. Dado que el LUCC y la deforestación en áreas de bosques tropicales no pueden explicarse exclusivamente por cambios demográficos (e.g. WALKER 2006, BARBIERI ET AL. 2005, PERZ Y WALKER 2002), un análisis a nivel de hogares facilita una comprensión integral del cambio en el uso del suelo. De acuerdo con el enfoque de los ciclos de vida de los hogares (WALKER ET AL. 2002), las prácticas de uso del suelo están determinadas por la composición del hogar y las características demográficas de los miembros. Además, los valores individuales y colectivos desempeñan un papel en el comportamiento en relación a los usos del suelo y pueden provocar cambios en el manejo de recursos (JONES ET AL. 2016, RAMCILOVIC-SUOMINEN ET AL. 2013, GEIST Y LAMBIN 2002, SYDENSTRICKER-NETO 2002, BRIASSOULIS 2000, BENGSTON Y XU 1996) y en la organización social de la población local (SPEELMAN ET AL. 2013). Esta investigación aborda el LUCC en el valle del Alto Nangaritza en la Amazonía sur del Ecuador, un área originalmente de ocupación del grupo indígena Shuar, a donde inmigrantes Mestizos y Saraguros han llegado desde la región andina. El objetivo es analizar en conjunto las perspectivas a mesoescala y a microescala del LUCC y comprender mejor sus interacciones en áreas de frontera agrícola desde un enfoque multiescalar. Con base en un enfoque de métodos mixtos, se utilizaron métodos cuantitativos y cualitativos de investigación. La investigación del LUCC a mesoescala se llevó a cabo para un período de 35 años utilizando la interpretación de fotografías aéreas (IGM) y el análisis de imágenes satelitales (Eyefind RESA - RapidEye) en los años 1978, 1986, 2000, 2010, 2013. Para este propósito, se calcularon y compararon el porcentaje del área de cobertura y la tasa anual de cambio de las clases de cobertura/uso de suelo: bosque (forest), pasto (pastures), tala de árboles/cultivos (tree clearing/crops) y asentamientos/carreteras (settlement/road). Posteriormente, según los datos del censo en 1990, 2001 y 2010 (INEC), se analizaron las tendencias poblacionales y se identificaron las fases de colonización relacionadas con el LUCC. Así, se pudieron evaluar los cambios espaciales en el bosque y la conversión de la cobertura del suelo en usos más intensivos como resultado de los procesos de colonización. Con el fin de determinar los cambios en el uso del suelo a microescala, se realizaron durante tres fases de trabajo de campo en 2014, 2015 y 2016 entrevistas semiestructuradas a expertos (8 individuos), cuestionarios multi-objetivo estructurados a hogares y talleres participativos (26 hogares), así como entrevistas no estructuradas (6 individuos). Los datos recopilados de los cuestionarios de hogares se evaluaron estadísticamente con Microsoft Excel y SPSS y las declaraciones en las entrevistas con los expertos se codificaron y se sometieron a un análisis de contenido cualitativo. El análisis de los usos del suelo (bosque, pastos, aja/huerta y cultivos de comercialización) y sus prácticas a nivel del hogar se basó en las cinco etapas del ciclo de vida, relacionadas con el número y la edad de los miembros del hogar (CEPAL 2006, WALKER 2006), y complementadas con el tiempo de ocupación de los hogares (VANWEY ET AL. 2005, MCCRACKEN ET AL. 1999). Para la evaluación de los valores abordados por los diferentes grupos étnicos, el concepto de forest values values (BENGSTON UND XU 1996) fue ampliado para incluir otras clases de uso del suelo y desarrollar un marco analítico propio para los valores de uso del suelo (land-use values). Para este propósito, los valores sobre cada uso de suelo se recopilaron de manera inductiva mediante las herramientas de free listing (BERNARD 2006, THOMPSON Y JUAN 2006, QUINLAN 2005) y Likert scale ranking (SPENCE Y OWENS 2011, BERNARD 2006) dentro de talleres participativos, para ser posteriormente analizados calculando su salience index (THOMPSON Y JUAN 2006, SUTROP 2001, SMITH Y BORGATTI 1997, SMITH 1993). A nivel de mesoescala, los resultados de uso y cobertura del suelo indicaron que, considerando el área total, el bosque disminuyó de aproximadamente el 94% en 1978 a cerca del 71% en 2013. Aunque el bosque seguía siendo la mayor cobertura durante ese periodo, los pastos aumentaron de 5,5% a 22%. Ambas coberturas de suelo alcanzaron tasas anuales de cambio más altas entre 2010 y 2013, con máximos de -2.65 %/año de bosque y 8 %/año de pastos, en relación con la construcción de la carretera. Al mismo tiempo, además de los usos del suelo extensivos, las áreas de cultivo con un manejo intensivo también transformaron el paisaje. Estas áreas crecieron del 0,4% en 1978 a casi el 7% en 2013. La comparación de las tasas de cambio anuales promedio (1978-2013) mostró que éste fue más alto para las tierras con cultivos de manejo intensivo (7,8%/año) que para los pastos (3,9%/año). A esta escala, se ha observado que el incremento de usos extensivos e intensivos con dirección al mercado ha llevado a una pérdida local del bosque y que esta dinámica del LUCC está todavía relacionada con la inmigración en diferentes fases de colonización. A nivel de microescala, los porcentajes de uso de suelo correspondietes a las cinco etapas de los ciclos de vida de los hogares (MCCRACKEN ET AL. 1999) revelaron la influencia de otros factores. A lo largo de las primeras etapas (I, II, III), el bosque disminuyó en tanto que los pastos aumentaron hasta alcanzar un punto de inflexión cuando el bosque tendió a recuperarse de las áreas de uso hacia etapas posteriores (IV, V). Si bien los cambios en el bosque y los pastos estaban más conectados con la demanda y disponibilidad interna de mano de obra, los principales motores de cambios en el aja/huerta fueron las demandas de alimentos de los miembros del hogar y la disposición de ingresos para adquirir alimentos además de su propia producción agrícola. El manejo de este uso de suelo es responsabilidad de la mujer quien toma las decisiones sobre el cultivo del mismo. Además, la tierra con cultivos de comercialización estba más bien influenciada por la situación financiera de los hogares que les permita afrontar los costos del cultivo. Por otro lado, el factor del tamaño de la tierra en uso influye en todos los usos del suelo así como en su porcentaje dentro del área en uso. Adicionalmente, la propiedad de la tierra así como los derechos de uso, en gran parte determinados por la etnicidad, también afectan los usos del suelo. Además, el análisis de los valores de uso del suelo desarrollado para esta investigación proveyó de información sobre lo que era bueno o deseable de un uso del suelo desde el punto de vista de los grupos locales. La consideración de los valores en la investigación sobre LUCC revela la subjetividad, los intereses y preferencias que están detrás de las decisiones sobre los usos del suelo de los actores locales. El bosque y el aja/huerta fueron descritos con una amplia variedad de valores (e.g. valores de soporte de vida, ambiental-biodiversidad, económico, espiritual) por los Shuar y los colonos Mestizos y Saraguros. Estas descripciones de valores desempeñan un papel importante en las decisiones de los hogares en relación a estos usos de suelo. Características como seguridad alimentaria o conservación fueron especialmente resaltadas sobre las categorías de bosque y aja/huerta, en tanto que los pastos y los cultivos de comercialización fueron asignados un valor prioritariamente económico por razones de venta por todos los grupos locales. En cuanto al intercambio de conocimientos en el Alto Nangaritza, éste ha hecho posible, por un lado, la sobrevivencia de los colonos bajo condiciones ambientales diferentes y que puedan ganar experiencia local que minimicen los riesgos económicos adoptando técnicas agrícolas probadas para su seguridad alimentaria. Por otro lado, el flujo de conocimiento llevó a que los Shuar adapten prácticas de uso de la tierra y técnicas para la producción orientada al mercado. Las asimetrías de poder dentro de una matriz de colonialismo interno (ESPINOSA 2017, JARRÍN ET AL. 2016) y la superioridad percibida de los colonos (PARK 2012) hicieron que ciertas técnicas fueran percibidas como más efectivas por los Shuar especialmente para satisfacer las demandas del mercado. En este caso, la producción para el mercado, que requiere el uso de técnicas similares, nivela las usuales diferencias étnico-culturales en las prácticas de uso del suelo entre los grupos, ofreciendo a los nativos un posible nicho de mercado y participación social en el estado nacional, aunque sea de manera marginal. En resumen, el ejemplo del Alto Nangaritza muestra la importante contribución de un enfoque multiescalar al análisis de LUCC. Mientras que a mesoescala, los cambios espaciales en el uso del suelo y su relación con los procesos de inmigración pudieron determinarse y representarse, el análisis a nivel de hogar enriqueció la comprensión de las dinámicas de uso de suelo influenciadas de manera distinta por factores internos y externos a lo largo de las etapas de los ciclos de vida. Estos resultados apoyan evidencia empírica previa con respecto a la no linealidad (non-linearity, VANWEY 2006, PERZ ET AL. 2005) en el cambio de uso del suelo. Además, esta investigación destaca la importancia de los valores de uso del suelo como marco de análisis en futuros estudios y evaluaciones relacionadas con los recursos en diferentes contextos espaciales. Finalmente, la implementación exitosa y la aceptación general de políticas de uso de suelo y de conservación requieren, por lo tanto, una consideración integradora de varias escalas. Para este propósito, es necesaria una sensibilización acerca de la etnicidad mediante la inclusión y participación activa de las poblaciones locales, sus percepciones, prácticas de uso de la tierra, así como la dinámica de los hogares.show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar Statistics
Metadaten
Author:Viviana Buitron Cañadas
Persistent identifiers - URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:29-opus4-125548
Referee:Fred Krüger, Achim Bräuning
Advisor:Perdita Pohle, Maria Lopez Sandoval
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Language:English
Year of publication:2019
Date of online publication (Embargo Date):2019/12/11
Publishing Institution:Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU)
Granting institution:Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
Acceptance date of the thesis:2019/01/18
Release Date:2019/12/16
Length/size:1-380
Institutes:Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
Dewey Decimal Classification:9 Geschichte und Geografie / 91 Geografie, Reisen / 918 Geografie Südamerikas und Reisen in Südamerika
open_access (DINI-Set):open_access
Licence (German):Creative Commons - CC BY-NC-ND - Namensnennung - Nicht kommerziell - Keine Bearbeitungen 4.0 International