• search hit 12 of 102
Back to Result List

Growth Ring Measurements of Shorea robusta Reveal Responses to Climatic Variation

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:29-opus4-118674
  • Many tropical species are not yet explored by dendrochronologists. Sal (Shorea robusta Gaertn.) is an ecologically important and economically valuable tree species which grows in the southern plains and mid-hills of Nepalese Central Himalayas. Detailed knowledge of growth response of this species provides key information for the forest management. This paper aims to assess the dendroclimatic potential of Shorea robusta and to understand climatic effects on its growth. A growth analysis was done by taking 60 stem disc samples that were cut 0.3 m above ground and represented different diameter classes (>10 cm to 50 cm). Samples were collected and analysed following standard dendrochronologicalMany tropical species are not yet explored by dendrochronologists. Sal (Shorea robusta Gaertn.) is an ecologically important and economically valuable tree species which grows in the southern plains and mid-hills of Nepalese Central Himalayas. Detailed knowledge of growth response of this species provides key information for the forest management. This paper aims to assess the dendroclimatic potential of Shorea robusta and to understand climatic effects on its growth. A growth analysis was done by taking 60 stem disc samples that were cut 0.3 m above ground and represented different diameter classes (>10 cm to 50 cm). Samples were collected and analysed following standard dendrochronological procedures. The detailed wood anatomical analysis showed that the wood was diffuse-porous, with the distribution of vessels in the entire ring and growth rings mostly marked with gradual structural changes. The basal area increment (BAI) chronology suggested that the species shows a long-term positive growth trend, possibly favoured by the increasing temperature in the region. The growth-climate relationship indicated that a moist year, with high precipitation in spring (March–May, MAM) and summer (June–September, JJAS), as well as high temperature during winter (November–February) was beneficial for the growth of the species, especially in a young stand. A significant positive relationship was observed between the radial trees increment and the total rainfall in April and the average total rainfall from March to September. Similarly, a significant positive relationship between radial growth and an average temperature in winter (November–January) was noted.show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar Statistics
Metadaten
Author:Sony Baral, Narayan Prasad Gaire, Sugam Aryal, Mohan Pandey, Santosh Rayamajhi, Harald Vacik
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:29-opus4-118674
DOI:https://doi.org/10.3390/f10060466
ISSN:1999-4907
Title of the journal / compilation (English):Forests
Publisher:MDPI
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Date of first Publication:2019/05/29
Publishing Institution:Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU)
Release Date:2019/08/30
Tag:Nepal; Shorea robusta; community forest; disc; tree-ring; tropical region
Volume:10
Issue:6
Original publication:Forests 10.6 (2019): 466. <https://www.mdpi.com/1999-4907/10/6/466>
Institutes:Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 55 Geowissenschaften, Geologie / 550 Geowissenschaften
open_access (DINI-Set):open_access
Collections:Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg / Eingespielte Open Access Artikel / Eingespielte Open Access Artikel 2019
Licence (German):Creative Commons - CC BY - Namensnennung 4.0 International