• search hit 2 of 2
Back to Result List

Synthetic Cannabinoid Use in a Psychiatric Patient Population: A Pilot Study

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:29-opus4-107991
  • Background: Consumption of natural cannabis (NC) and synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) has been associated with psychotic disorders. We compared the prevalence of use, consumer profiles, and psychosis-inducing potential of NC and SCs in a specific high-risk population. Methods: This prospective pilot study included 332 patients (18-64 years, mean 36.83, SD 13.33). Patients' sociodemographics and medical histories as well as illicit substance use and psychiatric symptom histories were collected using a drug consumption survey that assessed the use of new psychoactive substances and the Psychotic Symptoms Interview. Results: In total, 7.2% of all patients, 10.6% of psychotic patients, andBackground: Consumption of natural cannabis (NC) and synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) has been associated with psychotic disorders. We compared the prevalence of use, consumer profiles, and psychosis-inducing potential of NC and SCs in a specific high-risk population. Methods: This prospective pilot study included 332 patients (18-64 years, mean 36.83, SD 13.33). Patients' sociodemographics and medical histories as well as illicit substance use and psychiatric symptom histories were collected using a drug consumption survey that assessed the use of new psychoactive substances and the Psychotic Symptoms Interview. Results: In total, 7.2% of all patients, 10.6% of psychotic patients, and 4.5% of nonpsychotic patients reported SC consumption. Compared with SCs, NC was consumed much more frequently by its users (mean 222.73, SD 498.27). NC and SC use induced persistent psychosis. Psychotic symptoms were first experienced by patients with a history of NC or SC use during intoxication and persisted after cessation (>1 year) of drug use. Positive and negative symptoms tended to be more severe in SC and NC users, respectively. Conclusions: NC and SCs may cause different symptom clusters. These relationships should be further evaluated.show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar Statistics
Metadaten
Author:Stella Welter, Caroline Lücke, Alexandra Philomena Lam, Christina Custal, Sebastian Moeller, Peter Sörös, Christiane M. Thiel, Alexandra Philipsen, Helge H. O. Müller
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:29-opus4-107991
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000479554
Title of the journal / compilation (English):European Addiction Research
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of Completion:2017
Embargo Date:2019/04/05
Publishing Institution:Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU)
Release Date:2019/04/05
Tag:Cannabinoid consumption; Psychosis; Synthetic cannabinoid consumption
Volume:23
Issue:4
Pagenumber:182 - 193
Original publication:European Addiction Research 23.4 (2017): S. 182 - 193. <https://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/479554> © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel
Institutes:Medizinische Fakultät
Dewey Decimal Classification:6 Technik, Medizin, angewandte Wissenschaften / 61 Medizin und Gesundheit / 610 Medizin und Gesundheit
open_access (DINI-Set):open_access
Collections:Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg / Allianzlizenzen: Alle Beiträge sind mit Zustimmung der Rechteinhaber aufgrund einer DFG-geförderten Allianzlizenz frei zugänglich. / Allianzlizenzen 2017
Licence (German):Keine Creative Commons Lizenz - es gilt der Veröffentlichungsvertrag und das deutsche Urheberrecht