Analytical and numerical study of microswimming using the 'bead-spring model'

Analytische und numerische Studie des Mikroschwimmens anhand des 'Teilchen-Feder-Modellsystems'

  • In this thesis we use the bead-spring microswimmer design as a model system to study mechanical microswimming. The basic form of such a swimmer was introduced as the 'three-sphere swimmer' in Najafi & Golestanian, Phys. Rev. E (2004) and has found wide use in theoretical, numerical and experimental research. In our work, we have modified and extended the model in various ways, which, as explained in this thesis, allow us to gain insight into many general principles of microswimming, for instance the interplay between fluid drag force and swimmer elasticity in determining the efficiency of motion. The work presented here consists of both analytical solution of the equations of motion in the dIn this thesis we use the bead-spring microswimmer design as a model system to study mechanical microswimming. The basic form of such a swimmer was introduced as the 'three-sphere swimmer' in Najafi & Golestanian, Phys. Rev. E (2004) and has found wide use in theoretical, numerical and experimental research. In our work, we have modified and extended the model in various ways, which, as explained in this thesis, allow us to gain insight into many general principles of microswimming, for instance the interplay between fluid drag force and swimmer elasticity in determining the efficiency of motion. The work presented here consists of both analytical solution of the equations of motion in the different investigated cases and corresponding numerical study. We begin this thesis with an introduction (chapter 0) to the world of low Reynolds number locomotion, and in particular to that of microswimming, explaining the current state of knowledge in the field regarding biological microswimmers and models thereof, both theoretical and experimental. We then explain in chapter 1 the details of, and the differences between, the Golestanian three-sphere swimmer and our bead-spring model. The Golestanian model consists of three spheres aligned along one line with the distances between two neighbouring spheres in each pair being changed in a controlled manner (which determines the swimming stroke), leading to propagation of the assembly. In the bead-spring model, we replace the specification of the stroke by that of the forces driving the motion, allow non-spherical and shape-varying beads in the design, and, in the last part of the thesis, investigate swimmer motion beyond the low Reynolds number (Stokes) regime. These changes result in a more comprehensive description of the motion with the influences of different factors such as the fluid viscosity, the energy input, the elasticity of the swimmer and its instantaneous and mean shapes all becoming important, unlike in the Golestanian swimmer where these influences are all subsumed in the specification of the swimming stroke. We use our model to calculate the velocity of our swimmer both with rigid and deformable spheres, and to different orders in the relative magnitude of bead size and bead separation. In chapter 2, we explain the two simulation methods used by us, the Walberla system and the LB3D code. Both of these are based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), and their main difference lies in their being coupled respectively to a rigid body physics engine, which allows us to simulate any combinations of rigid objects in fluids, and an immersed boundary method (IBM) solver with which we can simulate deformable membranes. In chapter 3, we compare the swimmer velocities as obtained from theory and the two simulation systems for swimmers with rigid beads. We find good agreement which expectedly becomes better as the simulation systems become more idealised, such as by an increased simulation domain size and smaller Reynolds numbers of motion. We also explain how and why some microswimmers swim faster in more viscous fluids. We show that this puzzling phenomenon, observed experimentally for many species of bacteria, can occur in fully Newtonian fluids--a result which runs counter to the prevailing wisdom in the field--and arises from the dichotomous effects that the drag force has on motion at low Reynolds number. In particular, the so-called `aberrant' regime of motion, wherein the swimmer gets quicker as the fluid viscosity increases, is expected to show up for all mechanical microswimmers swimming due to the influence of sufficiently weak driving forces. The simulations fully support the theoretical prediction for the onset of the aberrant regime. In chapter 4, we use the LB3D code to simulate swimmers with deformable beads, to answer the question of whether passive shape changes--which are the changes in shape of a deformable swimmer in response to the fluid, not as a driving mechanism for motion--can be beneficial for swimming. This relates to the as yet unexplained phenomenon of metaboly, wherein spirochetes, which otherwse swim by flagellar propulsion, regularly change their shapes during their motion, without its being clear whether these shape changes are beneficial for locomotion, for food capture, or some other purpose. Restricting our attention to our model, we show that passive shape changes can result in both faster and slower swimming, and that this response depends on the swimmer's elasticity. The theory accurately predicts both the regimes, where the shape changes respectively promote and hinder the motion, that are visible in the simulations. In chapter 5 we look at active effects of shape, by studying the different swimming speeds of swimmers with rigid beads of different shapes. For this we allow the beads to be ellipsoids of revolution, and calculate the optimal aspect ratios of the ellipsoids (given a fixed volume or surface area) that maximize the swimming velocity for equal driving forces. We find that depending on the stiffness coefficient of the springs, the same shape (for instance, the ellipsoid of the lowest drag coefficient) may result in the fastest or the slowest swimmer, owing to the different energy costs of deforming springs of low and high stiffness. We show that this happens due to the swimming in the two cases being dominated either by a reduction in the drag force opposing the beads or by the hydrodynamic interaction amongst them. In chapter 6 we expand the scope of our study to incorporate the onset of non-Stokesian effects in microswimming. Using the Walberla simulation system, we systematically increase the forces driving the beads, thereby raising the Reynolds number of motion and ultimately pushing the swimmer beyond the Stokes regime. We show that the limit of this regime may be determined by matching the coasting exhibited by the swimmer to that of an underdamped harmonic oscillator, with the damping constant arising from the Stokes drag law. The effective radius of the swimmer thus found agrees excellently with that obtained from theory, and indicates that inertial effects in microswimming set in at increased driving forces (or, equivalently, larger swimming strokes) or at increased swimmer masses. Building on this heuristic investigation, we modify our theoretical model by adding a mass acceleration term in the governing equations of motion of the three beads, and show that solution of the resultant system predicts swimmer velocities which are in good agreement with those observed in simulations (and which differ significantly from the Stokes-regime calculation results). These calculations confirm the identification of the Stokes, non-Stokes and intermediate regimes seen in the simulations. We conclude in chapter 7 by a discussion of the main results presented in our work, and future possibilities for its extension.show moreshow less
  • In dieser Dissertation nutzen wir das Teilchen-Feder Design eines Mikroschwimmers als ein Modellsystem, um mechanisches Mikroschwimmen zu untersuchen. Die Grundform eines solchen Schwimmers wurde als der 'Drei-Kugel-Schwimmer' in Najafi & Golestanian, Phys. Rev. E (2004) eingeführt und wurde im Folgenden in theoretischen, numerischen und experimentallen Untersuchungen ausgiebig genutzt. In unserer Arbeit haben wir das Grundmodell auf verschiedene Arten modifiziert und erweitert. Wie in dieser Dissertation beschrieben erlaubt uns dies Einblicke in viele grundlegende Prinzipien des Mikroschwimmens wie zum Beispiel das Zusammenspiel zwischen Widerstandskräften des Fluids und der Elastizität deIn dieser Dissertation nutzen wir das Teilchen-Feder Design eines Mikroschwimmers als ein Modellsystem, um mechanisches Mikroschwimmen zu untersuchen. Die Grundform eines solchen Schwimmers wurde als der 'Drei-Kugel-Schwimmer' in Najafi & Golestanian, Phys. Rev. E (2004) eingeführt und wurde im Folgenden in theoretischen, numerischen und experimentallen Untersuchungen ausgiebig genutzt. In unserer Arbeit haben wir das Grundmodell auf verschiedene Arten modifiziert und erweitert. Wie in dieser Dissertation beschrieben erlaubt uns dies Einblicke in viele grundlegende Prinzipien des Mikroschwimmens wie zum Beispiel das Zusammenspiel zwischen Widerstandskräften des Fluids und der Elastizität des Schwimmers um die Effizienz der Bewegung zu ermitteln. Die hier präsentierte Arbeit ist eine Untersuchung, die sowohl aus dem analytischen Lösen der Bewegungsgleichungen für die verschiedenen Fälle, als auch aus den entsprechenden numerischen Studien besteht. Wir beginnen diese Dissertation mit einer allgemeinen Einleitung (Kapitel 0) in die Welt der Bewegungen bei kleinen Reynoldszahlen, insbesondere in die des Mikroschwimmens. Dann klären wir den aktuellen Wissensstand über biologische Mikroschiwmmer um dann das Kapitel mit theoretischen und experimentellen Modellen dazu zu beschließen. Danach erklären wir in Kapitel 1 die Details des Golestanian'schen Drei-Kugel-Schwimmers und die Unterschiede zu unserem Teilchen-Feder Modell. Im Golestanian'schen Modell sind die drei Kugeln entlang einer Linie ausgerichtet und die Abstände zwischen zwei benachbarten Kugeln werden für jedes Paar in einer kontrollierten Art und Weise verändert, was den Schwimmschlag bestimmt und zu einer Bewegung des Schwimmers führt. Wir ersetzen in dem Teilchen-Feder Modell die Vorgaben an den Schwimmschlag mit denen der treibenden Kräfte für die Bewegung, lassen auch nicht-sphärische und formverändernde Teilchen in unserem Design zu und untersuchen im letzten Teil der Dissertation die Bewegungen des Schwimmers jenseits des Stokes-Regimes. Diese Änderungen resultieren in einer allgemeineren Beschreibung der Bewegung unter dem Einfluss der verschiedenen Akteure wie der Fluidviskosität, dem Energieeintrag, der Elastizität des Schwimmers und seiner instantanen und mittleren Form, wobei jeder einen wichtigen Beitrag zum Schwimm-verhalten leistet. Im Gegensatz dazu werden diese Einflüsse im Golestanian'schen Schwimmer in den Vorgaben an den Schwimmschlag zusammengefasst. In unserem Modell berechnen wir die Geschwindigkeit des Schwimmers sowohl mit festen, als auch mit verformbaren Teilchen und verändern darüber hinaus das Verhältnis aus Teilchengrößen zu den Abständen zwischen den Teilchen. In Kapitel 2 erklären wir die beiden von uns genutzten Simulationsmethoden Walberla und LB3D. Beide Simulationsmethoden basieren auf der Lattice-Boltzmann-Methode (LBM) und unterscheiden sich hauptsächlich darin, wie sie an Simulationsmethoden für die Bewegung der Teilchen gekoppelt sind. Bei Walberla handelt es sich um eine Physik-Engine für starre Körper, die jede beliebige Kombination von starren Körpern in einem Fluid simulieren kann. Im Gegensatz dazu handelt es sich bei LB3D um die 'Immersed Boundary Methode' (IBM), mit der schließlich auch deformierbare Membranen simuliert werden können. In Kapitel 3 vergleichen wir die Theorie mit den beiden Simulationsmetho-den anhand der Geschwindigkeiten für Schwimmer mit starren Teilchen. Wir erhalten eine gute Übereinstimmung, die wie erwartet noch besser wird, wenn das simulierte System weiter idealisiert wird, z.B. durch eine größere Simulations-umgebung oder kleinere Reynoldszahlen. Wir erklären zudem ob und wie einige Mikroschwimmer schneller in viskoseren Fluiden schwimmen können. Wir zeigen, dass dieses faszinierende und für viele Bakterienarten experimentell beobachtete Phänomen in einem vollkommenen Newton'schen Fluid auftreten kann -- ein Ergebnis, das der vorherrschenden Lehrmeinung des Feldes widerspricht. Dieses Phänomen lässt sich durch einen zweigeteilten Effekt von Widerstandskräften des Fluids auf die Bewegung bei kleinen Reynoldszahlen erklären. Insbesondere das so genannten "aberrante" Regime, in dem der Schwimmer schneller wird als die Fluidviskosität erhöht wird, wird für alle mechanische Mikroschwimmer, die unter dem Einfluss von ausreichend kleinen Antriebskräften schwimmen, erwartet. Auch unsere Simulationen unterstützen die theoretischen Vorhersagen für das aberrante Regime. In Kapitel 4 nutzen wir den LB3D Simulationscode für Schwimmer mit deformierbaren Teilchen, um Fragen bezüglich passive Formänderungen, d.h. Formänderungen von deformierbaren Teilchen aufgrund des Einflusses des Fluids und nicht als Mechanismus für eine Fortbewegung, beantworten zu können. Diese Fragestellung ist mit dem bislang unerklärten Phänomen 'Metaboly' verbunden, wo Spirochetes, die sonst durch einen Antrieb durch ihr Flagellum schwimmen, ihre Form während der Bewegung verändern. Dabei ist noch unklar, ob diese Formänderungen für die Fortbewegung, zur Jagd von Nahrung oder für andere Gründe nützlich sind. Bezogen auf unser Modell zeigen wir, dass passive Formänderungen sowohl schnelleres als auch langsameres Schwimmen verursachen können und dass das konkrete Ergebnis von der Elastizität des Schwimmers abhängt. Die Theorie sagt die beiden, in der Simulation gefundenen Regime präzise voraus. In Kapitel 5 untersuchen wir den Einfluss der Teilchenform auf die Schwimmgeschwindigkeit. Dafür betrachten wir die Teilchenkörper als Ellipsoide und berechnen ihr optimales Aspektverhältnis unter einem gegebenen Volumen oder einer gegebenen Oberfläche, das die Schwimmgeschwindigkeit für gleiche Antriebskräfte maximiert. Als Funktion der Federstärke beobachten wir, dass die gleiche Form, wie zum Beispiel der Ellipsoid für den geringsten Widerstandskoeffizienten, zum schnellsten oder zum langsamsten Schwimmer führen kann. Der Grund dafür liegt in den verschiedenen energetischen Kosten für die Verformung von Federn mit verschiedenen Federstärken. Des Weiteren zeigen wir, dass dieser Effekt entsteht, weil die Schwimmbewegungen in den beiden Fällen entweder durch eine Reduktion der Widerstandskräfte entgegen der Teilchen oder durch die hydrodynamische Wechselwirkung zwischen den Teilchen bestimmt wird. In Kapitel 6 erweitern wir die Reichweite unserer Untersuchung durch die Betrachtung von Effekten auf das Mikroschwimmen jenseits des Stokes-Regimes. Mit Hilfe der Walberla-Simulationsmethode können wir systematisch die bestimmenden Kräfte auf die Teilchen und damit die Reynoldszahlen erhöhen, so dass schließlich der Schwimmer das Stokes-Regime verlässt. Wir zeigen, dass die Grenzen dieses Regimes durch eine Abbildung des Schwimmers auf einen schwach gedämpften harmonischen Oszillator beschrieben werden kann. Die Abklingkonstante der Dämpfung ist dabei durch das Stokes'sche Gesetz gegeben. Der dafür gefundene effektive Radius des Schwimmers ist in au\ss erordentlich guter Übereinstimmung mit dem Radius aus der Theorie. Dies zeigt, dass Trägheitskräfte für das Mikroschwimmen relevant werden, sobald die Antriebskräfte (oder entsprechend die Schwimmschläge) größer oder die Schwimmer massiver werden. Aufbauend auf dieser heuristischen Untersuchung modifizieren wir unser theoretisches Modell durch Hinzufügen eines Beschleunigungsterms für die Massen zu den bestimmenden Gleichungen für die drei Teilchen. Die Lösungen dieses modifizierten Systems sagen Schwimmergeschwindigkeiten voraus, die in guter Übereinstimmung mit den in unseren Simulationen beobachteten Geschwindigkeiten stehen, und dabei signifikant von den Lösungen im Stokes-Regime abweichen. Diese Rechnungen bestätigen das Stokes-, das Nicht-Stokes- und das dazwischen liegende Regime, die alle in Simulationen beobachtet wurden. Wir beenden diese Arbeit mit einer Diskussion der wichtigsten Ergebnisse und zukünftigen Weiterentwicklungen in Kapitel 7.show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

  • Export Bibtex
  • Export RIS

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar
Metadaten
Author:Jayant Pande
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:29-opus4-79551
Advisor:Ana-Suncana Smith
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Language:English
Year of Completion:2016
Embargo Date:2016/12/19
Publishing Institution:Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU)
Granting Institution:Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
Date of final exam:2016/12/13
Release Date:2017/01/09
Tag:bead-spring model, analytical model
SWD-Keyword:Lattice Boltzmann Method; microswimmer
Institutes:Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
Dewey Decimal Classification:Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / Physik / Mechanik der Fluide; Mechanik der Flüssigkeiten
open_access (DINI-Set):open_access
Licence (German):Creative Commons - Namensnennung

$Rev: 13581 $