High-Resolution Observations of Active Galactic Nuclei in the Southern Hemisphere

Hochauflösende Beobachtungen Aktiver Galaxienkerne am Südhimmel

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:29-opus4-52264
  • In this work, high-resolution observations combined with multiwavelength monitoring of extragalactic jets are presented, aiming at a better understanding of these objects. Jets are extremely bright, highly relativistic astrophysical sources emitting light across the electromagnetic spectrum. According to our current knowledge, jets of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are well collimated material outflows emerging from the center of AGN due to accretion onto a supermassive black hole. These objects belong to the most powerful and persistent sources in the Universe. Extensive multiwavelength studies established a consistent overall picture of AGN jets, but the underlying emission andIn this work, high-resolution observations combined with multiwavelength monitoring of extragalactic jets are presented, aiming at a better understanding of these objects. Jets are extremely bright, highly relativistic astrophysical sources emitting light across the electromagnetic spectrum. According to our current knowledge, jets of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are well collimated material outflows emerging from the center of AGN due to accretion onto a supermassive black hole. These objects belong to the most powerful and persistent sources in the Universe. Extensive multiwavelength studies established a consistent overall picture of AGN jets, but the underlying emission and formation processes are still not completely understood. A typical broadband spectral energy distribution shows a double-humped shape, which is well explained by synchrotron radiation of relativistic electrons in the lower energy regime, but the physical processes from the X-ray to gamma-ray bands are still heavily discussed. Open questions concerning AGN physics involve the emission mechanism, jet composition, formation and acceleration. In order to gain more information and to constrain theoretical models, I investigate the parsec-scale and high-energy properties of extragalactic jets in this work. I focus on the sample of the monitoring program TANAMI (Tracking Active Galactic Nuclei with Austral Milliarcsecond Interferometry), which regularly observes extragalactic jets in the Southern Hemisphere using Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) radio observations complemented by multiwavelength monitoring. VLBI measurements obtain the best insight into this enigmatic objects, resolving structures down to scales of less than a milliarcsecond (mas). With this technique the (sub-)parsec scale morphology, surface brightness and spectral distribution of the jets can be studied in great detail. VLBI monitoring allows the investigation of jet kinematics and interaction with the ambient medium. These high-resolution radio images are combined with multiwavelength monitoring from radio to gamma-rays in order to simultaneously study spectral and structural changes. Correlations of high energy activity with variations within the jet give crucial information on production sites and mechanisms of the high energy photons. In addition, multimessenger astronomy, i.e., the search for extragalactic neutrinos from AGN, aims at investigating the possible hadronic constitution of jets. The TANAMI sample consists of 75 of the brightest extragalactic jets south of -30° declination. High-resolution radio monitoring is complemented by (quasi-)simultaneous multiwavelength monitoring, in particular by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. About three-quarters of all sources are detected by Fermi, making this an ideal sample to study possible differences in the parsec-scale properties of gamma-ray faint and loud objects. The TANAMI sample study shows that the gamma-ray bright sources are more core dominated and have higher brightness temperatures, confirming previous findings. For the quasars in the sample, however, the situation is not that clear: their mas-scale morphologies do not show a clear correlation of compactness with gamma-ray flux density and their brightness temperatures are more broadly distributed. This result indicates the existence of possible sub-types of quasars, which might explain why some of these powerful radio sources are high energy emitters while others are not. The gamma-ray variability of the TANAMI jets is used to select possible neutrino emitters for a point source search with the neutrino telescope ANTARES. Confirming AGN as neutrino sources would tremendously help to constrain parameters of jet emission models as well as to identify jets as cosmic ray accelerators. The sensitivity of ANTARES for point source searches can be significantly enhanced by taking the precise source position and additional time information into account. Therefore, a method was developed to select only sources which exhibit short and bright flares over four years of Fermi monitoring in the gamma-rays. This work paves the way for future multimessenger projects to search for extragalactic neutrinos. The presented sample study yields a better, overall understanding and picture of extragalactic jet properties, while more detailed information are best acquired with individual source studies. For this purpose, I discuss the VLBI observations, complemented by multiwavelength data, of two particular sources of the TANAMI sample, namely PMNJ1603-4904 and Centaurus A. Like for most of the newly detected gamma-ray bright extragalactic jets in the Southern Hemisphere, no VLBI information has been available for PMNJ1603-4904 before it was added to the TANAMI sample. This object is one of the brightest gamma-ray sources in the sky and was initially classified as a blazar. TANAMI observations revealed a symmetric mas-scale morphology, with the brightest, most compact feature at the center. This appearance along with unusual broadband properties are very atypical for a blazar. Multiwavelength observations reveal among other things an excess in the infrared, and an iron line in the sensitive X-ray spectrum, which allows the first redshift measurement of the spectrum. As these features challenge the classification as a blazar, an alternative explanation as a young radio source with possible starburst contribution in the host galaxy is considered. If confirmed, PMNJ1603-4904 would be the first object in this class and would add to the group of jet sources with high inclination angles, of which only few are detected in gamma-rays. These sources challenge current models which attempt to explain the high-energy emission with high Doppler beaming factors. The investigation of these sources can help to determine the emission regions and mechanism of the highly energetic photons in jets. Centaurus A belongs to this group of objects of gamma-ray bright radio galaxies and, more important, it is the closest AGN, such that VLBI observations with TANAMI probe jet features of ~0.02 pc in size and jet physics can be studied in unrivaled detail. I present these high-resolution observations, revealing complex jet dynamics and a potential connection between increased hard X-ray flux and higher jet activity. The study of the jet kinematics gives a consistent picture of the innermost parsec of the jet: a spine-sheath like structure fits best to the observed downstream acceleration of the flow. A disturbance causing a widening of the jet flow can be explained by an interaction of the jet and a star. Multiwavelength monitoring yields a possible correlation of higher X-ray emission and increasing jet activity, which could indicate a common emission origin. In conclusion, in the framework of the TANAMI monitoring program the emission and formation mechanisms of extragalactic jets are studied. Therefore, this work focuses on the comprehensive study of two special sources with the goal to gain better knowledge of the whole sample.show moreshow less
  • Diese Arbeit beschäftigt sich mit der detaillierten Analyse von extragalaktischen Jets, mit dem Ziel, die Physik dieser Objekte besser zu verstehen. Dazu werden hochauflösende Aufnahmen mit simultanen Multiwellenlängenbeobachtungen, die das ganze elektromagnetische Spektrum abdecken, kombiniert. Jets sind hochrelativistische, astrophysikalische Quellen. Sie gehören zu den leuchtkräftigsten Objekten im Universum und können bis in den Gammastrahlungsbereich extrem hell sein. Nach heutigem Stand der Forschung sind Jets stark gebündelte Materieströme, die aufgrund von Masseakkretion auf ein supermassives Schwarzes Loch im aktiven Kern einer Galaxie (englisch: ‘active galactic nucleus’ oder AGN)Diese Arbeit beschäftigt sich mit der detaillierten Analyse von extragalaktischen Jets, mit dem Ziel, die Physik dieser Objekte besser zu verstehen. Dazu werden hochauflösende Aufnahmen mit simultanen Multiwellenlängenbeobachtungen, die das ganze elektromagnetische Spektrum abdecken, kombiniert. Jets sind hochrelativistische, astrophysikalische Quellen. Sie gehören zu den leuchtkräftigsten Objekten im Universum und können bis in den Gammastrahlungsbereich extrem hell sein. Nach heutigem Stand der Forschung sind Jets stark gebündelte Materieströme, die aufgrund von Masseakkretion auf ein supermassives Schwarzes Loch im aktiven Kern einer Galaxie (englisch: ‘active galactic nucleus’ oder AGN) entstehen. Dank umfangreicher Multiwellenlängenbeobachtungen lässt sich ein einheitliches Gesamtbild eines AGN-Jets konstruieren, jedoch sind die Emissions- und Enstehungsprozesse noch nicht vollständig verstanden. Das typische Breitbandspektrum einer Jetquelle hat die Form eines Doppelhöckers. Bei niedrigen Energien lässt sich diese spektrale Form durch Synchrotronstrahlung erklären, doch die zugrunde liegenden Prozesse im Röntgen- bis Gammastrahlungsbereich sind noch nicht eindeutig geklärt. So existieren noch viele offene Fragen zur Physik von AGN, bezüglich der Emissionsmechanismen und des Aufbaus, der Enstehung und Beschleunigung von Jets. Um weitere Informationen zu erhalten und den Parameterraum bestehender Emissionsmodelle besser einschränken zu können, untersuche ich in dieser Arbeit die innersten Bereiche (kleiner als ein Parsec) und die spektralen Charakteristiken bei hohen Energien von extragalaktischen Jets. Dabei konzentriere ich mich auf Quellen am Südhimmel, die im Rahmen des Projekts TANAMI (Tracking Active Galactic Nuclei with Austral Milliarcsecond Interferometry) regelmäßig beobachtet werden. Dieses Beobachtungsprogramm ergänzt hochauflösende Aufnahmen, die mit Hilfe von Radiointerferometrie gemacht werden, mit simultanen Multiwellenlängenbeobachtungen. Radiointerferometrische Beobachtungen auf langen Basislinien (englisch: ‘Very Long Baseline Interferometry’ oder kurz VLBI) können ein räumliches Auflösungsvermögen von weniger als einer Millibogensekunde erzielen. Mit dieser Technik lassen sich die schärfsten, am höchsten aufgelösten Bilder aufnehmen und somit die Morphologie, Oberflächenhelligkeit und Spektrum des innersten Teils des Jets sehr genau studieren. Regelmäßige VLBI-Beobachtungen erlauben die zeitliche Entwicklung der Jets abzubilden und somit die Jetkinematik und mögliche Wechselwirkungen mit dem umgebenden Medium zu studieren. Die detaillierten Untersuchungen der kleinskaligen Struktur wird durch regelmäßige Multiwellenlängenbeobachtungen ergänzt, um zeitgleich spektrale Informationen zu erhalten. Diese kombinierten Beobachtungen sind deshalb entscheidend, da Korrelationen zwischen der Aktivität im Hochenergiebereich und Änderungen der Jetstruktur Aufschluss über den Entstehungsort und -mechanismus der hochenergetischen Photonen geben können. Bezieht man des Weiteren noch die Suche nach extragalaktischen Neutrinoquellen in die Nachforschungen mit ein, spricht man von Multimessenger-Astronomie. Dies kann dabei helfen, die genaue Zusammensetzung von Jets aus Leptonen und möglicherweise Hadronen zu entschlüsseln. Das TANAMI-Sample besteht aus 75 der hellsten extragalaktischen Jets am Südhimmel im Deklinationsbereich südlich von -30°. Hochauflösende Radiobeobachtungen aller Quellen werden mit (quasi-)simultanen Multiwellenlängenbeobachtungen kombiniert, insbesondere vom Fermi-Weltraumteleskop im Gammabereich. Ungefähr dreiviertel aller TANAMI-Quellen sind bei diesen hohen Energien detektiert. Somit ist dies ein ideales Sample, um die Gammastrahlungsquellen mit den nicht detektierten Jets zu vergleichen und nach möglichen Unterschieden in den kleinskaligen Strukturen (<1 pc) zu suchen. Die Studie des gesamten TANAMI-Samples ergibt, dass die im Gammabereich hellen Jets stärker durch ihre kompakte Kernemission dominiert sind und höhere Helligkeitstemperaturen haben. Dies bestätigt vorangegangene Beobachtungen. Allerdings zeigt sich für die Quasare im Sample, dass deren Morphologie keine starke Korrelation zwischen der Kompaktheit und dem Gammastrahlungsfluss aufweist. Darüber hinaus sind die Werte der Helligkeitstemperatur der Quasare vergleichsweise breiter verteilt. Dieses Ergebnis lässt darauf schließen, dass es möglicherweise Untergruppen von Quasaren mit verschiedenen spektralen Eigenschaften gibt. Die Gammastrahlungsvariabilität der TANAMI-Quellen geht zusätzlich in die Kandidatenauswahl möglicher Neutrinoquellen für eine Punktquellensuche mit dem Neutrinoteleskop ANTARES ein. Könnten AGN als Neutrinoquellen bestätigt werden, würde das den Parameterraum von Emissionsmodellen ungemein einschränken und könnte Jets als Beschleuniger kosmischer Strahlung identifizieren. Unter Berücksichtigung der präzisen Quellposition und Informationen zur zeitlichen Variabilität kann die Sensitivität des Neutrinoteleskops signifikant erhöht werden. Dazu wird eine Selektion für die Punktquellensuche erarbeitet und präsentiert, die explizit nur TANAMI-Quellen mit hellen und kurzen Strahlungsausbrüchen auswählt. Diese Studie ebnet den Weg für zukünftige Projekte zur Suche nach extragalaktischen Neutrinos mit Hilfe von Multimessenger-Astronomie. Die Studie des TANAMI-Samples liefert ein tieferes Verständnis und allgemeines Bild der Jet-Eigenschaften, doch detailliertere Informationen können besser mit Analysen einzelner Quellen erworben werden. Zu diesem Zweck werden VLBI- und Multiwellenlängenbeobachtungen zweier besonderer TANAMI-Quellen, nämlich PMNJ1603-4904 und Centaurus A, analysiert und diskutiert. Wie für die meisten der neu entdeckten, extragalaktischen Gammastrahlungsquellen am Südhimmel, waren auch für PMNJ1603-4904 keine VLBI-Informationen verfügbar bevor die Quelle ins TANAMI-Beobachtungsprogramm aufgenommen wurde. Dieses Objekt gehört zu den hellsten extragalaktischen Gammastrahlungsquellen am Himmel und war ursprünglich als Blazar klassifiziert. Die hoch aufgelösten Bilder der TANAMI-Beobachtungen zeigen eine symmetrische Morphologie mit der hellsten, kompaktesten Komponente im Zentrum der Emissionsregion und einer Ausdehnung von wenigen Millibogensekunden. Diese Struktur und diverse ungewöhnliche spektrale Eigenschaften sind sehr untypische Charakteristiken für einen Blazar. Multiwellenlängenbeobachtungen zeigen unter anderem eine unerwartet prominente Emission im Infrarotbereich und eine dünne Eisenlinie im Röntgenspektrum. Letztere erlaubt die erste Messung der Rotverschiebung der Quelle. Da diese Eigenschaften schwierig mit der Klassifikation als Blazar in Einklang zu bringen sind, wird eine alternative Klassifikation als junge, im Gammabereich helle Radiogalaxie mit möglicher starker Sternentstehungsrate betrachtet. Würde PMNJ1603-4904 als ein solches Objekt bestätigt werden, wäre es das erste dieser Klasse. Da es nur wenige Gammastrahlungsquellen gibt, deren Jets unter einem großen Winkel zur Sichtlinie gesehen werden, würde PMNJ1603-4904 diese Quellgruppe erweitern. Diese Jets stellen eine Herausforderung für die derzeitigen Emissionsmodelle dar, die die Gammastrahlung mit Hilfe von hohen Dopplerfaktoren erklären. Daher kann die Erforschung dieser Objekte dazu beitragen, die Emissionregionen und -mechanismen von hochenergetischen Photonen in Jets besser zu verstehen. Centaurus A gehört genau zu dieser Gruppe der im Gammabereich detektierten Radiogalaxien und ist darüber hinaus bei einer Entfernung von nur 3.8 Mpc der nächste AGN. VLBI Beobachtungen mit TANAMI erlauben die derzeit besten Aufnahmen dieser Quelle mit einer Auflösung von ~0.02 pc. Die Ergebnisse dieser Studie des innersten Parsecs eines extragalaktischen Jets wird in dieser Arbeit vorgestellt und ausführlich diskutiert. Die komplexe Kinematik zeigt eine nach außen zunehmende Beschleunigung des Jetflusses und kann am besten durch ein Modell aus einem schnellen, dichten Jetinneren, umhüllt von einer langsameren, dünneren Schicht beschrieben werden. Die Beobachtungen zeigen eine lokale Unterbrechung der Strömung, die mit einem Rückgang der Jethelligkeit und einem Aufweiten des Jets einhergeht, was durch die Kollision des Jets mit einem Stern erklärt werden. Multiwellenlängenbeobachtungen der letzten Jahre ergeben eine mögliche Korrelation zwischen erhöhter Röntgenemission und Jetaktivität, die Hinweis auf eine gemeinsame Emissionregion geben kann. Zusammenfassend lässt sich sagen, dass im Rahmen des TANAMI-Beobachtungsprogramms die Emissions- und Entstehungsmechanismen extragalaktischer Jets studiert werden. Dabei geht diese Arbeit insbesonders auf die Forschungsergebnisse zweier spezieller Quellen ein, um weitere Erkenntnisse über die Physik von Jets zu gewinnen.show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar Statistics
Metadaten
Author:Cornelia Müller
Persistent identifiers - URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:29-opus4-52264
Referee:Jörn Wilms, Matthias Kadler
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Language:English
Year of publication:2014
Publishing Institution:Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU)
Granting institution:Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
Acceptance date of the thesis:2014/09/01
Release Date:2014/10/06
SWD-Keyword:Astronomy; Astrophysics; Black Hole; Very long baseline interferometry; active galactic nucleus
Institutes:Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Department Physik
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 52 Astronomie / 520 Astronomie und zugeordnete Wissenschaften
PACS-Classification:90.00.00 GEOPHYSICS, ASTRONOMY, AND ASTROPHYSICS (for more detailed headings, see the Geophysics Appendix) / 98.00.00 Stellar systems; interstellar medium; galactic and extragalactic objects and systems; the Universe
open_access (DINI-Set):open_access
Licence (German):Keine Creative Commons Lizenz - es gilt der Veröffentlichungsvertrag und das deutsche Urheberrecht
Einverstanden ✔
Diese Webseite verwendet technisch erforderliche Session-Cookies. Durch die weitere Nutzung der Webseite stimmen Sie diesem zu. Unsere Datenschutzerklärung finden Sie hier.