Animal Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Trends and Path Toward Standardization

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:29-opus4-130940
  • Animal whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a non-invasive window into brain activity. A collection of associated methods aims to replicate observations made in humans and to identify the mechanisms underlying the distributed neuronal activity in the healthy and disordered brain. Animal fMRI studies have developed rapidly over the past years, fueled by the development of resting-state fMRI connectivity and genetically encoded neuromodulatory tools. Yet, comparisons between sites remain hampered by lack of standardization. Recently, we highlighted that mouse resting-state functional connectivity converges across centers, although large discrepancies in sensitivityAnimal whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a non-invasive window into brain activity. A collection of associated methods aims to replicate observations made in humans and to identify the mechanisms underlying the distributed neuronal activity in the healthy and disordered brain. Animal fMRI studies have developed rapidly over the past years, fueled by the development of resting-state fMRI connectivity and genetically encoded neuromodulatory tools. Yet, comparisons between sites remain hampered by lack of standardization. Recently, we highlighted that mouse resting-state functional connectivity converges across centers, although large discrepancies in sensitivity and specificity remained. Here, we explore past and present trends within the animal fMRI community and highlight critical aspects in study design, data acquisition, and post-processing operations, that may affect the results and influence the comparability between studies. We also suggest practices aimed to promote the adoption of standards within the community and improve between-lab reproducibility. The implementation of standardized animal neuroimaging protocols will facilitate animal population imaging efforts as well as meta-analysis and replication studies, the gold standards in evidence-based science.show moreshow less

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar Statistics
Metadaten
Author:Francesca Mandino, Domenic H. Cerri, Clement M. Garin, Milou Straathof, Geralda A. F. van Tilborg, M. Mallar Chakravarty, Marc Dhenain, Rick M. Dijkhuizen, Alessandro Gozzi, Andreas Hess, Shella D. Keilholz, Jason P. Lerch, Yen-Yu Ian Shih, Joanes Grandjean
Persistent identifiers - URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:29-opus4-130940
Persistent identifiers - DOI:https://doi.org/10.3389/fninf.2019.00078
ISSN:1662-5196
Title of the journal / compilation (English):Frontiers in Neuroinformatics
Publisher:Frontiers Media S.A.
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of publication:2020
Date of first Publication:2020/01/22
Publishing Institution:Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU)
Release Date:2020/01/22
Tag:DREADD; non-human primate; optogenetics; resting-state; rodent
Volume/year:13
Original publication:Frontiers in Neuroinformatics 13 (2019). <https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fninf.2019.00078/full>
Institutes:Medizinische Fakultät
Dewey Decimal Classification:6 Technik, Medizin, angewandte Wissenschaften / 61 Medizin und Gesundheit / 610 Medizin und Gesundheit
open_access (DINI-Set):open_access
Collections:Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg / Eingespielte Open Access Artikel / Eingespielte Open Access Artikel 2020
Licence (German):Creative Commons - CC BY - Namensnennung 4.0 International