• Treffer 13 von 49
Zurück zur Trefferliste

Residual stress Formation in component related stress relief cracking Tests of a welded creep resistant steel

  • Submerged arc welded (SAW) components of creep-resistant low-alloyed Cr-Mo-V steels are used for thick-walled heavy petrochemical reactors (wall-thickness up to 475 mm) as well as employed in construction of modern high-efficient fossil fired power plants. These large components are accompanied by significant restraints during welding fabrication, especially at positions of different thicknesses like welding of nozzles. As a result, residual stresses occur, playing a dominant role concerning so-called stress relief cracking (SRC) typically during post weld heat treatment (PWHT). Besides specific metallurgical factors (like secondary hardening due to reprecipitation), high tensile residual stresses are a considerable influence factor on SRC. For the assessment of SRC susceptibility of certain materials mostly mechanical tests are applied which are isolated from the welding process. Conclusions regarding the influence of mechanical factors are rare so far. The present research followsSubmerged arc welded (SAW) components of creep-resistant low-alloyed Cr-Mo-V steels are used for thick-walled heavy petrochemical reactors (wall-thickness up to 475 mm) as well as employed in construction of modern high-efficient fossil fired power plants. These large components are accompanied by significant restraints during welding fabrication, especially at positions of different thicknesses like welding of nozzles. As a result, residual stresses occur, playing a dominant role concerning so-called stress relief cracking (SRC) typically during post weld heat treatment (PWHT). Besides specific metallurgical factors (like secondary hardening due to reprecipitation), high tensile residual stresses are a considerable influence factor on SRC. For the assessment of SRC susceptibility of certain materials mostly mechanical tests are applied which are isolated from the welding process. Conclusions regarding the influence of mechanical factors are rare so far. The present research follows an approach to reproduce loads, which occur during welding of real thick-walled components scaled to laboratory conditions by using Tests designed on different measures. A large-scale slit specimen giving a high restraint in 3 dimensions by high stiffness was compared to a medium-scale multi-pass welding U-Profile specimen showing a high degree of restraint in longitudinal direction and a small-scale TIG-remelted specimen. The small-scale specimens were additionally subjected to mechanical bending to induce loads that are found during fabrication on the real-scale in heavy components. Results show for all three cases comparable high tensile residual stresses up to yield strength with high gradients in the weld metal and the heat affected zone. Those high tensile stresses can be significant for cracking during further PWHT.zeige mehrzeige weniger

Volltext Dateien herunterladen

  • ECRS_Rhode_RS_CrMoV_BAM.pdf
    eng

Metadaten exportieren

Weitere Dienste

Teilen auf Twitter Suche bei Google Scholar
Metadaten
Autoren/innen:Arne Kromm
Koautoren/innen:Michael Rhode, Dirk Schröpfer, J. Steger, T. Lausch, Thomas Kannengießer
Dokumenttyp:Vortrag
Veröffentlichungsform:Präsentation
Sprache:Englisch
Jahr der Erstveröffentlichung:2018
Organisationseinheit der BAM:9 Komponentensicherheit
9 Komponentensicherheit / 9.4 Integrität von Schweißverbindungen
DDC-Klassifikation:Technik, Medizin, angewandte Wissenschaften / Ingenieurwissenschaften / Ingenieurwissenschaften und zugeordnete Tätigkeiten
Freie Schlagwörter:13CrMoV9-10; Creep resistant steel; Post weld heat treatment; Residual stress; Stress relief cracking; Welding
Themenfelder/Aktivitätsfelder der BAM:Material
Material / Life Cycle von Komponenten
Veranstaltung:European Conference on Residual Stresses - ECRS10
Veranstaltungsort:Leuven, Belgium
Beginndatum der Veranstaltung:11.09.2018
Enddatum der Veranstaltung:14.09.2018
Verfügbarkeit des Volltexts:Volltext-PDF im Netzwerk der BAM verfügbar ("Closed Access")
Datum der Freischaltung:20.09.2018
Referierte Publikation:Nein