• Treffer 2 von 233
Zurück zur Trefferliste

A complementary spectroscopic approach for the non invasive in situ identification of synthetic organic pigments in modern reverse paintings on glass

  • This work addresses the identification of synthetic organic pigments (SOP) in ten modern reverse paintings on glass (1912-1946) by means of an in-situ multi-analytical approach. The combination of the complimentary properties of mobile Raman spectroscopy and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) enabled the detection of sixteen SOP even in complex mixtures with inorganic compounds and binders. For the β-naphthol pigments, both Raman and DRIFTS yield appropriate results. DRIFTS was the preferred method for the detection of synthetic alizarin (PR83). Its diagnostic band pattern even allows its detection in complex mixtures with mineral pigments, binders and fillers. Raman spectroscopy yielded distinctive spectra for the triaryl carbonium pigments (PG1, PV2, PR81) and the two-yellow azo SOP (PY3, PY12), whereas DRIFT spectra were affected by extensive band overlapping. This may also occur in Raman spectra, but in less problematic amounts. Fluorescence is theThis work addresses the identification of synthetic organic pigments (SOP) in ten modern reverse paintings on glass (1912-1946) by means of an in-situ multi-analytical approach. The combination of the complimentary properties of mobile Raman spectroscopy and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) enabled the detection of sixteen SOP even in complex mixtures with inorganic compounds and binders. For the β-naphthol pigments, both Raman and DRIFTS yield appropriate results. DRIFTS was the preferred method for the detection of synthetic alizarin (PR83). Its diagnostic band pattern even allows its detection in complex mixtures with mineral pigments, binders and fillers. Raman spectroscopy yielded distinctive spectra for the triaryl carbonium pigments (PG1, PV2, PR81) and the two-yellow azo SOP (PY3, PY12), whereas DRIFT spectra were affected by extensive band overlapping. This may also occur in Raman spectra, but in less problematic amounts. Fluorescence is the major problem with Raman and it significantly hampers the SOP spectra even with the 785 nm laser. On the one hand the big spot size of DRIFTS (10 mm) limits the technique to rather large sampling areas, whereas the use of a 50× objective for in-situ Raman measurements permits a focus on small spots and aggregated SOP flakes. Moreover, “environmental” factors like temperature changes, artificial light, limited space and vibrations when people pass by need to be considered for in-situ measurements in museums. Finally, the results show the experimental use of SOP in modern reverse glass paintings. Among several rare SOP (e.g. PB52, PR81), two of them (PG1, PV2) have never been reported before in any artwork.zeige mehrzeige weniger

Volltext Dateien herunterladen

  • SOP_poster.pdf
    eng

Metadaten exportieren

Weitere Dienste

Teilen auf Twitter Suche bei Google Scholar
Metadaten
Autoren/innen:Simon Steger
Koautoren/innen:H Stege, S. Bretz, Oliver Hahn
Dokumenttyp:Posterpräsentation
Veröffentlichungsform:Präsentation
Sprache:Englisch
Jahr der Erstveröffentlichung:2019
Organisationseinheit der BAM:4 Material und Umwelt
4 Material und Umwelt / 4.5 Kunst- und Kulturgutanalyse
DDC-Klassifikation:Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / Chemie / Analytische Chemie
Freie Schlagwörter:DRIFTS; Raman spectroscopy; Reverse glass painting; Synthetic organic pigments
Themenfelder/Aktivitätsfelder der BAM:Analytical Sciences
Analytical Sciences / Zerstörungsfreie Prüfung und Spektroskopie
Veranstaltung:Technart2019
Veranstaltungsort:Bruges, Belgium
Beginndatum der Veranstaltung:07.05.2019
Enddatum der Veranstaltung:10.05.2019
Verfügbarkeit des Volltexts:Volltext-PDF im Netzwerk der BAM verfügbar ("Closed Access")
Datum der Freischaltung:20.05.2019
Referierte Publikation:Nein