• Treffer 56 von 184
Zurück zur Trefferliste

Nitrogen uptake of hypholoma fasciculare and coexisting bacteria

  • The white-rot fungus Hypholoma fasciculare coexists with a bacterial community that uses low-molecular weight carbon sources provided by fungal, extracellular enzyme activities. Since fungal development on wood is limited by the availability of nitrogen (N), bacteria could contribute to the N supply. To prove or disapprove an interaction in terms of N transfer, N sources of the fungus and the coexisting bacterial isolates were investigated, and the bacterial N2 fixation was quantified. Fungal, fungal—bacterial and bacterial wood decomposition was analysed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), mass loss and surface pH. Microbial N preferences were investigated by elemental analysis isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). In addition, diazotrophic activity was explored after cultivation under a 15N2/O2 atmosphere. Decomposition was similar with and without bacteria and both H. fasciculare and coexisting bacteria preferred reduced N species, such as urea, ammonium and organicThe white-rot fungus Hypholoma fasciculare coexists with a bacterial community that uses low-molecular weight carbon sources provided by fungal, extracellular enzyme activities. Since fungal development on wood is limited by the availability of nitrogen (N), bacteria could contribute to the N supply. To prove or disapprove an interaction in terms of N transfer, N sources of the fungus and the coexisting bacterial isolates were investigated, and the bacterial N2 fixation was quantified. Fungal, fungal—bacterial and bacterial wood decomposition was analysed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), mass loss and surface pH. Microbial N preferences were investigated by elemental analysis isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). In addition, diazotrophic activity was explored after cultivation under a 15N2/O2 atmosphere. Decomposition was similar with and without bacteria and both H. fasciculare and coexisting bacteria preferred reduced N species, such as urea, ammonium and organic N. In most of the bacteria, the 15N abundance in the biomass increased significantly but to a low extent if they were cultivated under a 15N2/O2 atmosphere. This effect is considered an artefact and attributed to adsorption rather than to bacterial N2 fixation activity. Hence, the bacteria coexisting with H. fasciculare rather competed for the same N sources than supported fungal N supply by diazotrophic activity.zeige mehrzeige weniger

Volltext Dateien herunterladen

  • 10.1007_s11557-012-0834-x.pdf
    eng

Metadaten exportieren

Weitere Dienste

Teilen auf Twitter Suche bei Google Scholar
Metadaten
Autoren/innen:Petra Weißhaupt, Annette Naumann, Wolfgang Pritzkow, Matthias Noll
Dokumenttyp:Zeitschriftenartikel
Veröffentlichungsform:Verlagsliteratur
Sprache:Englisch
Titel des übergeordneten Werkes (Englisch):Mycological progress
Jahr der Erstveröffentlichung:2013
Organisationseinheit der BAM:1 Analytische Chemie; Referenzmaterialien
1 Analytische Chemie; Referenzmaterialien / 1.5 Proteinanalytik
4 Material und Umwelt
4 Material und Umwelt / 4.1 Biologische Materialschädigung und Referenzorganismen
Verlag:Springer
Verlagsort:Heidelberg
Jahrgang/Band:12
Ausgabe/Heft:2
Erste Seite:283
Letzte Seite:290
Freie Schlagwörter:15N2 fixation; FTIR-ATR spectroscopy; Fungal-bacterial interaction; Hypholoma fasciculare; IRMS; Proteobacteria
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11557-012-0834-x
ISSN:1617-416X
ISSN:1861-8952
Verfügbarkeit des Dokuments:Datei im Netzwerk der BAM verfügbar ("Closed Access")
Datum der Freischaltung:20.02.2016
Referierte Publikation:Ja
Datum der Eintragung als referierte Publikation:05.08.2013