Das Suchergebnis hat sich seit Ihrer Suchanfrage verändert. Eventuell werden Dokumente in anderer Reihenfolge angezeigt.
  • Treffer 7 von 47780
Zurück zur Trefferliste

Scattering is a powerful tool to follow nucleation and growth of minerals from solutions

  • In recent years, we have come to appreciate the astounding intricacy of the processes leading to the formation of minerals from ions in aqueous solutions. The original, and rather naive, ‘textbook’ image of these phenomena, stemming from the adaptation of classical nucleation and growth theories, has increased in complexity due to the discovery of a variety of precursor and intermediate species. These include solute clusters (e.g. prenucleation clusters, PNCs), liquid(-like) phases, as well as amorphous and nanocrystalline solids etc.. Does it, however, mean that all the minerals grow through intermediate phases, following a non-classical pathway? In general, the precursor or intermediate species constitute different, often short-lived, points along the pathway from dissolved ions to the final solids (typically crystals in this context). In this regard synchrotron-based scattering (SAXS/WAXS/total scattering) appears to be the perfect tool to follow in situ and in a time-resolvedIn recent years, we have come to appreciate the astounding intricacy of the processes leading to the formation of minerals from ions in aqueous solutions. The original, and rather naive, ‘textbook’ image of these phenomena, stemming from the adaptation of classical nucleation and growth theories, has increased in complexity due to the discovery of a variety of precursor and intermediate species. These include solute clusters (e.g. prenucleation clusters, PNCs), liquid(-like) phases, as well as amorphous and nanocrystalline solids etc.. Does it, however, mean that all the minerals grow through intermediate phases, following a non-classical pathway? In general, the precursor or intermediate species constitute different, often short-lived, points along the pathway from dissolved ions to the final solids (typically crystals in this context). In this regard synchrotron-based scattering (SAXS/WAXS/total scattering) appears to be the perfect tool to follow in situ and in a time-resolved manner the crystallization pathway because of the temporal and spatial length scales that can be directly accessed with these techniques. In this presentation we show how we used scattering to probe the crystallisation mechanisms of calcium sulfate, This system contains minerals that are widespread in diverse natural environments, but they are also important in various industrial settings. Our data demonstrate that calcium sulfate precipitation involves formation and aggregation of sub-3 nm anisotropic primary species. The actual crystallisation and formation of imperfect single crystals of calcium sulfate phases, takes place from the inside of the in itial aggregates. Hence, calcium sulfate follows a non-classical pathway.zeige mehrzeige weniger

Volltext Dateien herunterladen

  • mineral_formation_DESY_2020.pdf
    eng

Metadaten exportieren

Weitere Dienste

Teilen auf Twitter Suche bei Google Scholar
Metadaten
Autoren/innen:Tomasz Stawski
Dokumenttyp:Vortrag
Veröffentlichungsform:Präsentation
Sprache:Englisch
Jahr der Erstveröffentlichung:2020
Organisationseinheit der BAM:6 Materialchemie
6 Materialchemie / 6.3 Strukturanalytik
DDC-Klassifikation:Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / Chemie / Analytische Chemie
Technik, Medizin, angewandte Wissenschaften / Ingenieurwissenschaften / Ingenieurwissenschaften und zugeordnete Tätigkeiten
Freie Schlagwörter:Calcium sulfate; Diffraction; Nucleation; SAXS/WAXS; Scattering; Synchrotron
Themenfelder/Aktivitätsfelder der BAM:Material
Material / Materialien und Stoffe
Material / Nanoskalige Materialien und deren Eigenschaften
Veranstaltung:X-ray Powder Diffraction at DESY - new opportunities for research and industry
Veranstaltungsort:Online meeting
Beginndatum der Veranstaltung:22.06.2020
Enddatum der Veranstaltung:25.06.2020
Verfügbarkeit des Dokuments:Datei im Netzwerk der BAM verfügbar ("Closed Access")
Datum der Freischaltung:29.06.2020
Referierte Publikation:Nein