Photoperception in black fungi that share niches with green organisms

  • Sunlight, the major source of energy, drives life but in excess it provokes UV-induced DNA damage, accumulation of reactive oxygen species, desiccation, osmotic stresses and so on. Biological strategies to survive excess light include protection, avoidance and active utilisation. Phototrophic organisms including cyanobacteria, green algae and plants use all three strategies. Fungi occupying phototrophic niches may profit from the surplus photosynthetic products which also obliges them to cope with the same light-induced stresses. One way of handling these stresses would be to use similar signalling pathways to sense the presence and to interact with their phototrophic partners. Obviously, the levels of adaptation and responses to light will depend on the environment as well as fungal genotype and phylogenetic position. Black fungi – a polyphyletic group – accumulate the dark pigment DHN melanin in their cell walls and often occupy light-flooded habitats from phyllosphere to rockSunlight, the major source of energy, drives life but in excess it provokes UV-induced DNA damage, accumulation of reactive oxygen species, desiccation, osmotic stresses and so on. Biological strategies to survive excess light include protection, avoidance and active utilisation. Phototrophic organisms including cyanobacteria, green algae and plants use all three strategies. Fungi occupying phototrophic niches may profit from the surplus photosynthetic products which also obliges them to cope with the same light-induced stresses. One way of handling these stresses would be to use similar signalling pathways to sense the presence and to interact with their phototrophic partners. Obviously, the levels of adaptation and responses to light will depend on the environment as well as fungal genotype and phylogenetic position. Black fungi – a polyphyletic group – accumulate the dark pigment DHN melanin in their cell walls and often occupy light-flooded habitats from phyllosphere to rock surfaces. Here we compare two sequenced melanised fungi of different lifestyles in their response to light. The Leotiomycete Botrytis cinerea is an aggressive pathogen that primarily infects the above-ground parts of plants. It possesses large numbers of photoreceptors that respond to a broad spectrum of light. As a consequence, light controls morphogenesis in which it induces conidiation for disease spreading and represses sclerotial development for survival and/or sexual recombination. Cellular components involved in photo-perception and regulation of morphogenesis, stress responses and virulence have been identified and appear to regulate propagation, survival and infection. These include phytochromes, a group of photoreceptors which are particularly enriched in the Leotiomycetes and that mediate coordinated responses to light and elevated temperatures. Assuming that photo-regulation may be equally important for fungi that live in mutualistic relationships with phototrophs either by forming composite organisms or biofilms, we investigate the role of light in the rock-inhabiting Eurotiomycete Knufia petricola. Like other black yeasts, K. petricola grows slowly, does not form specialised reproductive structures and constitutively produces DHN melanin as well as carotenoids. Combining K. petricola with the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme, we developed a model system for studying biofilm formation and bio-weathering. A genetic toolbox to manipulate this model system is being developed. K. petricola strain A95 possesses ten putative photoreceptors, more than found in filamentous Eurotiomycetes suggesting that light plays an important role for abiotic and biotic interactions in extremo-tolerant and symbiosis-capable fungi.zeige mehrzeige weniger

Volltext Dateien herunterladen

  • 2019-05-21_ISFUS Brazil_Julia Schumacher.pdf
    eng

Metadaten exportieren

Weitere Dienste

Teilen auf Twitter Suche bei Google Scholar
Metadaten
Autoren/innen:Julia Schumacher
Dokumenttyp:Vortrag
Veröffentlichungsform:Präsentation
Sprache:Englisch
Jahr der Erstveröffentlichung:2019
Organisationseinheit der BAM:4 Material und Umwelt
4 Material und Umwelt / 4.0 Abteilungsleitung und andere
DDC-Klassifikation:Technik, Medizin, angewandte Wissenschaften / Ingenieurwissenschaften / Sanitär- und Kommunaltechnik; Umwelttechnik
Freie Schlagwörter:Botrytis; Knufia; Nostoc; carotenoids; melanin
Themenfelder/Aktivitätsfelder der BAM:Umwelt
Umwelt / Umweltverhalten von Materialien und Produkten
Veranstaltung:International Symposium on Fungal Stress (ISFUS)
Veranstaltungsort:Sao Jose dos Campos, Brazil
Beginndatum der Veranstaltung:19.05.2019
Enddatum der Veranstaltung:23.05.2019
Verfügbarkeit des Dokuments:Datei im Netzwerk der BAM verfügbar ("Closed Access")
Datum der Freischaltung:04.06.2019
Referierte Publikation:Nein