First insights into Chinese reverse glass paintings gained by non invasive spectroscopic analysis

  • A non-invasive methodological approach (X-ray fluorescence (XRF), diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), Raman spectroscopy) has been carried out to identify the pigments and classify the binding media in two Chinese reverse glass paintings (The Archer, Yingying and Hongniang) from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The results reveal a combined use of traditional Chinese and imported European materials. Several pigments like cinnabar, lead white, orpiment, carbon black and copper-arsenic green (probably emerald green) were found in both paintings; red lead, artificial ultramarine blue, Prussian blue and ochre appear in at least one of the paintings. The presence of portlandite (Ca(OH)2) along calcite (CaCO3) in the fine-grained, white backing layer of Yingying and Hongniang indicates the presence of limewash. In Chinese tradition, limewash was produced from clamshells, and was then sold as clamshell white. In contrast to the Japanese pigment,A non-invasive methodological approach (X-ray fluorescence (XRF), diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), Raman spectroscopy) has been carried out to identify the pigments and classify the binding media in two Chinese reverse glass paintings (The Archer, Yingying and Hongniang) from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The results reveal a combined use of traditional Chinese and imported European materials. Several pigments like cinnabar, lead white, orpiment, carbon black and copper-arsenic green (probably emerald green) were found in both paintings; red lead, artificial ultramarine blue, Prussian blue and ochre appear in at least one of the paintings. The presence of portlandite (Ca(OH)2) along calcite (CaCO3) in the fine-grained, white backing layer of Yingying and Hongniang indicates the presence of limewash. In Chinese tradition, limewash was produced from clamshells, and was then sold as clamshell white. In contrast to the Japanese pigment, Chinese clamshell white was made of finely grounded shells, which were heated over a low fire. The residue (CaO) forms portlandite (Ca(OH)2) when water is continuously added. This water-rich mixture is applied on the painting. Portlandite reacts with atmospheric CO2 during drying and forms fine-grained calcite (CaCO3) [1,2]. The identification of emerald green (The Archer) suggests an earliest manufacturing date in the 1830s [3] and promotes the sinological dating of the painting. Drying oil was classified as a binding media in most areas of both paintings. However, the orange background of The Archer yielded prominent bands of both proteinaceous and fatty binder.zeige mehrzeige weniger

Volltext Dateien herunterladen

  • Poster_2_China.pdf
    eng

Metadaten exportieren

Weitere Dienste

Teilen auf Twitter Suche bei Google Scholar
Metadaten
Autoren/innen:Simon Steger
Koautoren/innen:D. Oesterle, R. Mayer, Oliver Hahn, S. Bretz, G. Geiger
Dokumenttyp:Posterpräsentation
Veröffentlichungsform:Präsentation
Sprache:Englisch
Jahr der Erstveröffentlichung:2019
Organisationseinheit der BAM:4 Material und Umwelt
4 Material und Umwelt / 4.5 Kunst- und Kulturgutanalyse
Freie Schlagwörter:Non-invasive analysis; Raman spectroscopy; Reverse glass painting
Themenfelder/Aktivitätsfelder der BAM:Analytical Sciences
Analytical Sciences / Zerstörungsfreie Prüfung und Spektroskopie
Veranstaltung:Technart2019
Veranstaltungsort:Bruges, Belgium
Beginndatum der Veranstaltung:07.05.2019
Enddatum der Veranstaltung:10.05.2019
Verfügbarkeit des Dokuments:Datei im Netzwerk der BAM verfügbar ("Closed Access")
Datum der Freischaltung:20.05.2019
Referierte Publikation:Nein